I had one breast slightly bigger than the other had had surgery yesterday but he used the same size implant in each breast.

I had my surgery yesterday and can't stop crying with how my breasts look I'm so unhappy I had one breast slightly larger than the other post surgery and the surgeon has used the same size implant in both breasts and the difference is really noticeable is there a reason he won't of used a larger one to even them out?

Doctor Answers 5

Asymmetry after surgery

After a breast augmentation it may take months to see the final results and for swelling to completely reduce. Just one day after operation, you will not be looking at the final results. Asymmetry is normal at this point. Keep up with your doctor and follow all of his instructions to ensure a safe recovery. If the results are not what you wanted months after, you should contact your plastic surgeon about a revision procedure.  


San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 68 reviews

Asymmetry

Hello,
When each breast starts out with a slightly different volume- which is common- they will swell and react to implant placement differently. There is a little more pressure in that bigger breast. Often small differences are exaggerated for a time as you heal. Your breasts will more or less even out so that when you are healed, you have the same slight difference you began with and it will not likely be so noticeable.
Try to be patient.
All the best

When differences in breast size are not large

it makes no sense to use different sized implants.  Analogy is golf ball and ping pong ball side by side (your breasts) where one is visibly larger... now mix a softball into each of them and now tell me which is larger?  Its really hard to tell.  There are many other reasons why one side may look larger as some people have a more prominent chest wall on one side or their shoulders are naturally crooked or they have scoliosis.  Use your hands to check the breast size and if close, you should be fine in the long run.  And if it really bothers you when you're healed, you can always talk to your surgeon about revising the smaller side with placement of a larger implant.  Now if you were a cup size difference, then asymmetric implants should have been part of your discussion.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

I had one breast slightly bigger than the other had had surgery yesterday but he used the same size implant in each breast.

Thank you for the question and I'm sorry to hear about your experience after surgery.
It is still very early, and you may have some asymmetric swelling of your breasts. This is normal after surgery, and it is still too early to judge your result. Stay in close contact your surgeon and communicate your concerns. Right now it's time to recuperate from surgery, so don't stress too much about the appearance because your breast will change significantly in the coming weeks-months.
It is common to use different sized implants in the breasts to correct differences in size.

Breast asymmetry not corrected?

I am really sorry to hear this. It must be difficult not getting what you hoped for. Please understand that results like this are reasons why it is very important for you to share and express your full expectations with your surgeon. It is also important to not have unrealistic expectations. Miscommunication is most likely the reason why different sized implants were not used. So please ask yourself the following questions:
  • Did you ask your surgeon to reduce the asymmetry in the breasts?
  • Did you give consent to have different sized implants used?
If yes, then please share your concerns with your surgeon. If you did not share this concern, then ask your surgeon to fix the asymmetry going forward, probably at your next follow-up visit. I hope this helps.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.