What type of surgery do I need for a broken nose? 16 male

Hello. I first off would like to share my experience. Broke my nose twice, at 10 and 13. One was because of a shoe thrown(small bump) and other nose slammed against own knee(leaving VERY crooked). The pictures are bad quality but my nose is far more crooked than it appears. My question is what type of surgery do I need? What are terms like deviated septum and others? How much would the cost be(estimate). I really liked my old nose, it was nice and appealing to everyone. Not this one though.

Doctor Answers 3

Rhinoplasty and septoplasty for broken nose due to trauma

If there is any nasal obstruction due to a fractured and deviated septum, this can be performed for medical necessity and billed to the patient's insurance. A broken nose repair( if it's causing nasal obstruction) can also be billed to the patient's medical insurance once medical necessity has been documented. To change the shape of the nose, this is considered rhinoplasty, and must be paid for by the patient. 


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 129 reviews

Surgery for Broken Nose

Rhinoplasty surgery will be necessary to straighten your nose. Fees will depend on where you live and the experience of your surgeon. However your health insurance will probably pay some of the cost because the appearance and compromised function of your nose was caused by trauma.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Basically, you need correction of the broken nose with a rhinoplasty.

Dear Vacate97;

If your nose is crooked, it generally means there is a deviated septum. The septum separates the right and left nasal passages and should be vertical to allow both nasal passages to move reasonable amounts of air. If it is deflected, twisted or crooked, then you have a breathing problem, so that needs to be evaluated. That should be done at consultation. A very thorough internal nasal exam is appropriate.

 Regarding the outside of your nose: you would do very well with the changes which would remove the bump and refine the tip. Maybe when you smile, the tip droops down, and that can be corrected also. The crookedness is generally related to possible bad positioning of the nasal bones as well as that internal nasal septum. It is not hard to figure that out. Because you "like your own nose, it was nice and appealing to everyone," it sounds like you are up for getting the old nose back, but maybe your new nose will be even better. Not a bad idea.

Do your rhinoplasty homework. Visit a lot of good rhinoplasty websites such as mine. Other surgeons have excellent and equally informative sites. Read books about the procedure. My two books (listed beldow) were written just for you so that you can learn and study and prepare. There are other excellent books that are also available, written by colleagues and other nasal surgery specialists.

You do want to have computer imaging when you go for your consultation. You want to be able to see the predicted results of your procedure. A consultation without that, to me, is worthless.You need to see on the surgeon's computer screen what changes can, or should be made, so that you're sure you will be happy. If the surgeon says he is not comfortable delivering the changes on the screen that you want, then move on to the next office. Ask to see the computer imaging examples of other patients in which you can see the before nose, then the computer-image results and the actual after-surgical, healed result.This is very important. You also want to see a before and after rhinoplasty collection with at least 100 cases of examples of what nasal surgery changes were made.

The more specialized the doctor you see, the more likely you are to have a satisfactory result, so spend your time wisely. Invest your time properly and learn as much as you can.

Best wishes from Beverly Hills, California,

Robert Kotler, MD, FACS

Robert Kotler, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 83 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.