2 pre-melanoma moles; one punched, one just shaved off. Is it possible to get rid of it completely by shaving it off with razor?

2 moles shave biopsied and came from pathology as "premelanoma/atypical" 1st one, was small and was slightly raised,this one has been removed by punching after report, Second one was wider,but wasn't raised,completely flat. Dr told me that they were able to remove this one all during the shave biopsy. If premelanoma mole is flat and not raised, is it possible to get rid of it completely by shaving it off with razor? I am seeing the scar is deep and wider than mole's margins. Thanks

Doctor Answers 2

Shave of mole

Without seeing the histology report it is not possible to properly answer your question. "Shave" does normally mean that the depth of tissue excised will be less that that of a normal excision. However if the histology report states that the mole is all out with an adequate border of normal tissue seen underneath the mole, then it has most likely been completely removed. You should ask your surgeon for details on the histology report.


Cambridge Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Is shave biopsy recommended for a mole suspicious for melanoma

Melanoma is the #1 cause of cancer death in woman 20-30 years old.  The very most critical staging component for a melanoma is: how thick is it?  Once a suspicious skin lesion (mole, in your case) is "shave biopsied", any attempt to evaluate the stage or thickness, is forever compromised.  In my practice, if the skin lesion is suspicious by initial microscope exam, a full-thickness, punch (3mm wide disc of the lesion) is obtained and evaluated by the pathologist.  If the lesion is "quite' or "convincingly" suspicious for melanoma at the initial visit, the lesion is scheduled for a full thickness removal w/ appropritate margins of normal skin around it, and the wound is then closed carefully in the natural skin creases.  We Never do shave biopsies. 

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