Tummy Tuck 8 Weeks Ago, and Have Hole in My Tummy?

I had a tummy tuck 8 weeks ago and now have a golf ball size hole in my tummy, which I have been told it will take another 8 weeks to heal. But every few days I have a fliuld build up which burst out of the hole. What bothers me is when the hole heals where is this fuild going to go. The build up is very painful for a few days but once it burst its a lot easiers. How long will these build ups continue.

Doctor Answers 8

Draining wound after a tummy tuck.

It is unfortunate to hear of your complication. Wound healing issues following a tummy tuck can occur, particularly along the incision. When a wound builds up fluid, you can feel the increase in pressure. When it releases, the pressure goes away and the often associated pain remits. I prefer to treat an area such as this with gauze packing. This prevents the cyclical build up/release phenomenon by wicking away the fluid. By allowing the fluid to drain, the wound will heal from the inside out. Compression garments can help with this process by limiting swelling.


Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Hole post tummy

This is noithing to worry about and eventually this will heal.The fluid will be absorbed by your body once the opening closes.Keeping the area clean is the most important.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Wound healing after tummy tuck

Let me assume that you are not talking pus/infection- but you and your ps must be sure that this is ruled out.

Given that this is not the case, you are talking about a seroma.  This is just a fluid collection of some blood and tissue fluid, along with perhaps some lymph fluid.  It builds up because tissue was injured, and thus the leak, while at the same time, the tissue hasn't developed enough to handle the fluid.

Eventually, the fluid output will decrease, and the body will be able to handle more fluid, and it will dry up.

Tummy Tuck 8 Weeks Ago, and Have Hole in My Tummy?

It sounds like you may have a draining seroma or abscess.  This problem needs to be looked at right away to see if immediate surgical intervention is needed or insertion of a drain may be in order.  whatever the diagnosis please see your Plastic Surgeon immediately.

Thomas Guillot, MD
Baton Rouge Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Hole in Tummy after Tummy Tuck #tummytuck

It is hard to say without seeing the wound. It sounds like you may have a wound that is not being packed with gauze dressings properly. So hard to say without knowing more details. Sounds like you should go see your surgeon to have them re-evaluate the wound and make some suggestions to you. Sometimes it is as simple as you may not be dressing it properly, or something more is going on that you need to have evaluated.

Richard J. Brown, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Seroma vs abscess after an abdominoplasty

  1. You either have a seroma or an abscess.  If the fluid is an abscess and there is some purulent drainage then you most likely have a retained deep infected suture.  You will need to be seen by your plastic surgeon to have this removed or it will never heal.  It seem unusual that as  a seroma that you would have a wound opening and draining.

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Tummy tuck

without photos or an exam, there is no way anyone can give you an educated guess as to what is going on. You need to continue to follow-up with your surgeon.

Hole in My Tummy?

Photos would be helpful, or at least some more info as to the location of the area in question. Otherwise, only your surgeon can answer, (and he/she is in a better position to answer even if I had photos). 

Given the history of repeated fluid build up, I wonder if your surgeon has considered placing a drain. The expectation is that the fluid secretion will stop, not that it will be buried. 

Follow up closely with your surgeon. All the best. 

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.