Is this infected, and should I see my dr.? (photos)

3 weeks post op, i had what looked like a little blood blister and it poped 4 days ago, now i have a open wound, it bleeds alittle bit everyday. Im worried it wont close because of the tension.

Doctor Answers 8

? Infected

Your wound does not look infected, there is still stitches present and these are probably causing some irritation. This is normal. Regards, Dr Steve Merten, Sydney, Australia

Nipple issue

Thank you for your photo and question.  Your nipple is still in the healing phase, but looks normal.  I would advise you to see your surgeon anyway for an in-person exam.  Best Wishes!

Jamie Moenster, DO
Tucson Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Is this infected, and should I see my dr.?

Hello dear, thanks for your question and provided information as well.. The breasts may lose their elasticity and firmness which can be caused by different factors such as pregnancy, massive weight loss, lactation and aging. To reaffirm the breasts and restore the natural look your surgeon can perform a mastopexy or breast lift. A breast lift restores a firmer, perkier, and more aesthetically pleasing shape to sagging breasts. This not only can improve a patient’s appearance by restoring her youthful, feminine proportions, but  also help bras and swimsuits fit more comfortably and attractively. By removing excess, stretched out skin, reshaping the breast tissue, and raising the nipple & areola into a more forward position, a cosmetic surgeon can create a more youthful breast contour. Stretched, large areolae can also be reduced during breast lift surgery, creating an overall better proportioned, natural looking breast, Actually the perkiness on a person or another, depends on patients skin and breast tissue… Breast augmentation surgery increases or restores breast size using silicone gel implants, saline implants or in some cases, fat transfer. One of the most popular and frequently performed aesthetic surgery procedures, breast augmentation has a long and successful track record in satisfying women who wish to enhance, regain or restore balance to their figures.

Tania Medina de Garcia, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 328 reviews

Ed, and should I see my dr.? (photos)

Thank you for the question and photo. From reviewing your photo it does not seem that bad normal healing some scabs coming off. Antibiotic ointment maybe adequate. I would recommend for you to follow up with your board certified plastic surgeon to make sure he or she agrees. Good luck.

Areola incision concerns

To answer your questions in order:  your incision does not look infected and you should see your doctor.  The picture looks like normal healing.  Your doctor will be able to direct the incision care as they see fit and reassure you.  This should heal completely normally.  Best wishes.

Infection on breast, it is or isn't it?

Hi Cece,Thanks for your question and photo. It does not look infected but it is always best to see your plastic surgeon to make sure that they feel you are healing the way they want you too. If fever or increased redness, or chills occur, you should see your surgeon asap. I would apply neosporin or bacitracin to the incision to help the healing process. Good Luck. Otherwise it looks beautiful. 

All the best,

Carlos Mata MD, MBA, FACS

#incision #breastlift

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon


It is always best to have wound concerns assessed in person. Superficial openings usually heal well with conservatives measures but I recommend that you follow up with your Plastic Surgeon.
All the best

Open area after Breast Surgery

Little spots of delayed healing or small suture reactions are not unusual after incisions around the areola despite some tension from the implant. Most heal up uneventfully with time. If you are not seeing improvement, or if it worsens with increasing drainage, redness or tenderness, you should see your doctor.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.