What are my chances of facing a complication like necrosis of the nipple for a revision gynecomastia gland excision only?

There is residual breast tissue in one nipple and my surgeon said blood supply can be compromised and it can be a littlw more risky than the first gland excision even though the cut is HALF MOON. What are my chances of getting necrosis of the nipple even partial and is it worth it or should i just live with the uneven nipples?

Doctor Answers 4

Risks and Necrosis Associated with Gynecomastia Surgery

As with all cosmetic surgery, results will be rewarding if expectations are realistic. With any surgical procedure, there are some risks which your doctor will discuss with you during your consultation. Reduced sensation of the nipple is possible, as it is with any breast surgery, and can lead to reduced nipple sensation. Reduced sensation is usually temporary following surgery and may require a few months resolve. However,  in some cases, the loss of sensation can be permanent. It is imperative you select a plastic surgeon who is #board-certified and has a great deal of experience with male breast #reduction. Plastic surgeons who have specialized in breast surgery and cosmetic surgery are suitable to perform your procedure. Aside from checking board-certification, it is suggested that you look at before and after photos of the surgeons actual patients, and read patient reviews. Gathering all of this information will help you make a well-informed decision and reduce the chance of a necessary revision.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Nipple necrosis

Dear foreveryoung908,

Thank you for your clinical post. The chance of a necrosis following a repeat glandular excision in the periareolar approach is relatively low. This is assuming that you’re a non-smoker and non-diabetic with no other systemic or local diseases. The other techniques designed to reduce post gynecomastia glandular asymmetry such as radio frequency assisted liposuction or BodyTite can be desirable alternatives to repeat incisional approaches to glandular excision. The risk of necrosis is quite low, most instances is likely less than 1%, however, the risk of increased anesthesia or numbness is relatively high.

I would recommend sitting down with your operative plastic surgeon, discussing your concerns in detail so you can make an informed decision.

I hope this information is of some assistance and best of luck.

To find out more, please visit the link below.

R. Stephen Mulholland, M.D.
Certified Plastic Surgeon
Yorkville, Toronto

R. Stephen Mulholland, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

Nipple necrosis

It depends on the specifics of the situation, including prior excisions, scarring, your smoking history, amount of tissue to be removed, possibly even other health issues.  You should speak with your surgeon and if you are concerned, even seek second opinions.  For most cases, the risk should generally be fairly low.

Jeffrey D. Wagner, MD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Nipple necrosis

Hard to tell beach the technique of the previous procedure is not known.
Loss of sensitivity is more common than necrosis, but it would depend on varios factors.

Carlos Castaneda, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.