Can you have a capsule happen twice? I've had and I'm sincerely sick and so upset over all of this. Do I change doctors?

I have had three procedures done on my breast, first regular implants, second I had a capsule and third my implant flipped. As well each time my scars were THICK and I was so so unhappy, each time my doctor in my opinion had done things that I questioned once I woke up. My breasts are amazing shape, but how in 2 years have I had 3 implant changes and 4 surgeries. We even went in to do a scar revision, it helped but now they're just brown and thick. I've done many laser treatments too.

Doctor Answers 6

Capsular contracture twice

It is not unusual for a patient to have a second capsular contracture .  Statistically, once you have a contracture , your odds increase for a second contracture.  As far as scarring, do you heal this way with other scars?  If so, that is not unusual.  A scar revision and/or laser treatments are your best options.


Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Recurrent Capsules

 It is well-known in our plastic surgery literature that once a patient has capsular contracture even after repair the likelihood of her having it again is higher. I have had good success in my practice with removal of the capsule and replacement with as much of it as possible with Strattice. As far as thicker or more darkly colored scars go we have had good success treating these with small holes made by a laser and placement of medications that can mitigate scar formation. Good luck with any anticipated revisions.

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Capsular contracture

A capsular contracture can recur and if you have it once, it is more common to have it the second time.  Best of luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Capsular contracture is an unfortunate situe

It sounds like your surgeon has tried various approaches.  Unfortunately it has failed.  Chances are that any future attempts would fail again.  An option to consider is to have the implants removed, sll scar tissue removed, and alliwing no less than  a year to let your body heal again before trying to repeat the augmentation.  It is not an ideal option but one you msy wish to consider.  Go back to square one.

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 425 reviews

Capsular contracture after breast augmentation

Hi,

Thanks for posting your question. I am happy to try and help you. It is important to remember that a board certified plastic surgeon will be your best resource when it comes to an accurate assessment of your situation, and concerns.

Having said that, capsular contracture is a very unfortunate condition that may develop after breast augmentation surgery. The cause is an enigma and we have some suspicions that it may be caused by subclinical bacterial infection, or excessive bleeding during or after surgery. The treatment is also complicated and some PS will through the kitchen sink at it trying to make it go away. Sometimes it works, other times it does not. Ultrasound, asthma medications, reoperating, scar tissue removal, changing to a different breast pocket, breast implant exchange and even implant removal have been suggested to treat it. The other problem is that it may go away after all of these heroic efforts only to have it return. In other cases, one of these may work and it does not come back. It is a tough problem.

Best wishes,

Dr. Michael J. Brown
Northern Virginia Plastic Surgeon

Before you change docs get a second opinion

Complications can happen to anyone and you sound like you've had your share. I never mind a patient getting a second opinion and, depending on the issue, will often recommend that they do. If you have concerns about your doc or his/her plan for you spending a few dollars to hear another opinion is money well spent. Good luck.

Robert Frank, MD
Munster Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.