Should I get septoplasty or septorhinoplasty? (photos)

I spoke with a doctor who said he can do turbinate reduction, septoplasty and "hump" removal (see pictures of current nose below). I know this will not perfect the tip of my nose, but I would like to avoid rhinoplasty if possible. Will the shaving down of my "hump" be enough to make my lose look more proportionate with regards to the rest of my face, or would you recommend I undergo actual rhinoplasty? I am looking for a straighter nose from a frontal view, and no bump on my nose from the lateral profile.

Doctor Answers 4

The difference between hump removal and rhinoplasty: No difference.

Hi.  If an ENT surgeon tells you he can do a septoplasty and turbinates and hump removal then he is doing a septorhinoplasty.  You are getting a rhinoplasty as soon as any part of the nose is touched whether it is hump or bump or tip or nostrils.  However you have a very complex nasal anatomy.  The average surgeon will create a disaster most likely needing major revision.  So PLEASE either do not touch your nose at all or do it right.  For your nose you need the hump reduced conservatively not all the way but also raising the upper part of the bridge above your current hump thereby creating a nice profile.  You need the middle vault opened up and supported with spreader grafts.  You have very thin skin and you need perfect technique and even some fascia under the skin to give it softness.  Whether you touch your tip or not is up to you but your "hump" is not that simple.  Furthermore I do think you have a very attractive face and getting a prettier nose will make it nicer.  But if you just do the septoplasty for now and not do the rhinoplasty, you will make the rhinoplasty more complex and limited in the future so either dont touch any of it or do it all at the same time with a great specialist. 

Washington DC Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 95 reviews

Confusion of terms

Removing the hump is a rhinoplasty indeed, the rhinoplasty is the cosmetic reshaping of the nose, if you are unhappy with your nose you can go for it.

The septoplasty is used to improve breathing through the nose whe a deviated septum is obstructing the airway.

Alejandro Nogueira, MD
Spain Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Septorhinoplasty Candidate

You appear to be a candidate for septorhinoplasty. The "hump" removal is just one form of rhinoplasty. Consult in person with 3 experienced and expert board certified plastic surgeons to understand your options.

Kris M. Reddy, MD, FACS
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Rhinoplasty and septoplasty are 2 completely separate procedures

 A septoplasty is performed in the back of the nose when there is a deviated septum present that  is blocking the air flow through the nose. A septoplasty is performed for medical necessity, and is billed to the patient's medical insurance. A septoplasty does not include a hump removal. A rhinoplasty is performed for cosmetic purposes to remove the dorsal hump. The dorsal hump is composed of both bone and cartilage and both must be shaved down in order to remove it. Once the hump has been removed,  osteotomies of the nasal bones are required to close the open roof, flat top nasal deformity created from the hump removal. Spreader grafts will most likely be required in the midportion of the nose to prevent the very thin upper lateral cartilages from collapsing inwards due to a thin nose that is pre-existing. Rhinoplasty is a very complex operation, so choose your rhinoplasty surgeon based on experience. If you perform only the septoplasty, it's important that plenty of cartilage is left behind for grafting purposes if you ever perform a rhinoplasty in the future.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 126 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.