Why is my right eyelid so droopy? (Photos)

When I was a kid I had even eyelids but as I got older for some reason my right eyelid is droopier than my left. What is causing this? How can I fix it?

Doctor Answers 7

Why is my right eyelid so droopy?

If you are complaining about dropping of the eyelids or lower eyelid bagginess then you might be a good candidate for the Laser Blepharoplasty operation. Although the plastic surgery era is highly developed and there are new treatment models for several other procedures; there is still no efficient alternative of blepharoplasty operation. If you are not comfortable with the look of your eyelids blepharoplasty operation may be a solution for you.

Don't see a general plastic surgeon for this.

You need to see an eyelid specialist.  That will be a board certified ophthalmologist with fellowship training in oculofacial surgery.  The American Society for Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery maintains a regional directory on their website that can help you identify a highly qualified surgeon in your area to assist you with this.  You have congenital ptosis and this may be covered by health insurance.  Ask.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Droopy brow

If you look at yourself in a mirror or examine the photos you submitted, you will notice you have moderately more wrinkles in your left forehead than your right. I suspect that if you could completely relax your brow you would notice they are even. Almost every patient I have ever seen tends to raise one brow more than the other, which can make the other look naturally lower. Many people raise their eyebrows as part of facial expression, while others raise their brow subconsciously to clear their field of vision of drooping eyelids. A surgeon well-versed in eyelid surgery can examine you and determine which you have.

Daniel Lensink, MD
Redding Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Your brow is also "droopy"

You need a comprehensive evaluation by a board certified plastic or occuloplastic surgeon. From you photo, it's possible that your entire situation could be corrected by a brow lift. Obviously, there is no way to evaluate your eyelid muscles from a photograph.

Donald W. Kress, MD, FACS
Frederick Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 12 reviews


You have ptosis of both upper eyelids.  See an oculoplastic surgeon who can evaluate your eyelid muscles to determine what surgery would be best to fix this.  If you have had this all your life then there may be some changes in the muscle that will have to be considered to get a good correction.  

John J. Martin, Jr., MD
Coral Gables Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Cause of Droopy Eyelid

I notice from your photos that your right upper eyelid seems to be a bit lower than the left. I also notice that your right brow (forehead and eyebrow) is lower. Everyone has some asymmetries. As we age things drop at different rates. Genetics sometime play a role in this as well. Having said that there are conditions that can lead to one eyelid drooping more than the other. This condition is called ptosis. It is a weakening or lengthening of the muscle that is charged with opening your eyelid. Aging and trauma are two causes of this. I recommend a visit to your oculoplastic surgeon for a complete work up.  Surgical repair can expected to improve this condition.

Brian Kobienia, MD
Edina Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews


Hi There, 

It seems you have bit of asymmetry. There are two options: Chemical and Surgical Brow lift. I would first recommend Botox. If this look appeals to you the next step would be an Endoscopic brow lift involving a few small incisions in your scalp to lift the eyebrow. 

Hope this helps, 

Javad Sajan, MD

Javad Sajan, MD
Seattle Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.