Labiaplasty and hood reduction not healing as hoped advice? (Photo)

I had these procedures & just don't notice much if any difference than I had before. I have interior stitches in the hood that are itchy & hard & look like bumps especially at the top. There are also strange goose bump looking bumps over the hood now? How much (what %) more do you all expect swelling to go down after 4 wks? I had trim method w laser. I'm pretty disappointed cosmetically that it looks basically the same. I wanted things to be more inside...

Doctor Answers 10

Healing from labiaplasty and more

can be distressing but you should have a good idea of what has been accomplished by now.  To say you see no difference suggests nothing was done so for others to comment on how well your results are, pre-op photos are needed.  Your current look appears quite good unless you wanted absolutely no labia left behind (you really should have at least a cm height from the reflection between the majora and the minora as the minora may have a function) and this was not communicated with your surgeon.  Bumps along your incisions will continue to get better so try not to worry about that.  In the end, you must bring your concerns to your surgeon and allow the two of you to find a suitable solution if truly not enough was removed.  


Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Post-Op Healing from Labiaplasty

Swelling after #Labiaplasty is usually present for several weeks.  It’s possible that swelling can persist for two or three months. Firmness of tissue can remain for 4-6 months. Postoperative care will usually consist of sitz baths or soaking the area in warm soapy water starting approximately 2 days after a surgery.  The sutures will dissolve over the course of several weeks.  This will in part depend upon the #Labiaplasty technique used, the amount of bruising and they way in which your body heals. Ice can help reduce swelling. Arnica and Bromelain may help.  Direct massage may be useful as well. Patients return to most normal activities immediately after surgery with the exception of activities that will create direct pressure on the #vaginalregion such as certain exercise equipment and #sexualactivity.  It will be necessary to refrain from these forms of physical activity, including sex, for approximately 4-6 weeks. Generally, patients are able to walk comfortably within a few days and can return to work within a week.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Labiaplasty healing

As the inventor and innovator of the wedge technique in 1994, I reconstruct many women who have had labia reductions by other surgeons, both wedge and trimming techniques. Your present dissatisfaction may be due to swelling or the specifics of the  technique used by your surgeon.  The reconstruction technique depends on the deformity. However, no attempt to revise your labia should be done until you are at least five months after your past procedure as your appearance will improve, and the swelling will be less. You need to control your anxiety and wait. The reconstruction is more difficult than a primary labiaplasty and should be done by a plastic surgeon with extensive experience in labia reconstruction. I published the first and most extensive paper on labia reconstruction in the prestigious journal "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery" about two years ago. You may need various reconstructive techniques to give you a good appearance, but this won't be known until all the swelling is gone. You only get one good chance to reconstruct you, so be patient and ask a lot of questions. Gary J. Alter, M.D.  Beverly Hills, CA - Manhattan, NYC

Gary J. Alter, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Labiaplasty: Postoperative Results

Thank you for your question.  Swelling is common after labiaplasty with the amount dependent in part based on the time since surgery.  The final result will be seen after several months, which at that time one can evaluate if a secondary surgery would be recommended.  I would recommend contacting the surgeon who performed the original surgery to evaluate your current condition.  If you wish to be evaluated for a secondary procedure, I would recommend an experienced cosmetic genital surgeon even if that means traveling.  Best of luck.     Jeffrey S. Palmer, MD, FACS, FAAP (Cosmetic Urologist -- Cleveland, Ohio)

Jeffrey S. Palmer, MD, FACS, FAAP
Cleveland Urologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

4 weeks is too early to tell

Thank you for your question. Labia and the clitoral hood are very delicate and swell a great deal. I inform all my of my patients that the final appearance may take 8-12 weeks. Without a before picture it is difficult to say how much was removed to note any progress. That said I would be patient and be in contact with your surgeon about your concerns. I am sure that he or she would want to know and can offer guidance. If after 3 months, you are not satisfied with your results, ask about a revision policy or seek a second opinion from a surgeon with experience in aesthetic vaginal surgery.Best of luck

Peter Castillo, MD, FACOG
Bay Area Urogynecologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Trim labiaplasty

You don't say how far postop you are but it appears you have some swelling present. However,if you are postop a few months, what you see is more than likely what you'll get. The trim method is notorious for leaving a thickened labia and is one of the reasons why I prefer my technique of a posterior wedge method (learn more on the link below).

Robert L. True, MD
Grapevine OB/GYN
4.9 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Why are labiaplasty healers so impatient?

It takes at least 6 weeks to heal to the point that swelling along the clitoris is minimal. If you had alot of work done, it may even take longer. Be patient. Suture material takes that long to dissolve and until it dissolves, much of what you see is suture material beneath the skin. You haven't healed sufficiently to be disappointed about anything more than the time it takes to fully heal.

Expectations with Labiaplasty

Thank you for your question and photo and I am sorry your result is not as expected.  It would be helpful to see a pre-op photo for comparison, but from what I see in the photo you provided, it looks as if everything is healing well and you have a good result.  Regarding the "bumps" of the clitoral hood - it is difficult to say from the photo, but those could be the result of ongoing inflammation and swelling, possibly from dissolving suture material, but I do not think they look worrisome.  All post-operative swelling and inflammation should be gone by 8-12 weeks post-op.  If you are still disappointed with results after that amount of time, say something to your surgeon.  If you are not satisfied with his/her response, seek another opinion if it really bothers you.In my experience, nearly all cases when the patient is disappointed with results occur because of poor communication between the surgeon and the patient with respect to expectations.  I am not placing any blame - it happens sometimes, despite good efforts to avoid it.  In order to minimize miscommunication, I ALWAYS have the following conversation with my patients at their pre-op visits: "The most important thing we discuss today is your expectations.  What do you want this procedure to accomplish for you?  How do you want your (insert body part) to look when it's all said and done?  Because if you have a goal that I cannot achieve, I have no hope of making you happy at the end of it all and I am in this business, because I like making my patients happy."  All plastic and cosmetic surgeons share that goal.  None of us want unhappy patients and the best way to avoid them is to have a very frank and detailed discussion about expectations BEFORE scheduling any surgery.  Both parties have to be honest and specific and the surgeon must be willing to tell a potential patient, "I'm sorry, but what you want, I cannot do.  Here is what I can do."  Then explain the procedure and why the patient may have unrealistic expectations.  If the patient decides to cancel the surgery, then that's for the best.  Doctors who are more concerned about selling a procedure than they are about the long-term happiness of the patient should be avoided anyway.  Photos can help with this process - just as you might take a magazine photo in to your hairdresser, you can also find photos of breasts, tummies, or labia, that show how you hope to look after healing from the procedure.  Even when you do all that, sometimes the results are not exactly as expected, but usually they will be very close, if not perfect, if you chose the right surgeon for the procedure.  If you go on the internet and look at labiaplasty before and after photos or even "adult" sites that show models (models who are paid because they have attractive private parts, whatever that means), you will find that your results are quite good, by comparison.

Labiaplasty and hood reduction not healing as hoped

Thank you for sharing your question and photograph and I am sorry that your current results have not been what you anticipated.  It is difficult to know what degree of correction or swelling you may have without photographs before surgery but in most cases 80-90% of swelling resolves in the first 6-8 weeks of recovery.  If at that time you are still unhappy with your results, seek a second opinion for a possible revision that can take place 3-6 months after your original procedure.  Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

4 weeks post op from SC

It is very difficult to say how much more the labia will reduce in size since all patients have varying amounts of swelling as well as recovery from the swelling.    I would ask you to sit back and wait to see if the swelling does away over another month and if you are not satisfied with the results then choose a surgeon who is experienced in revision surgeries of the labia.  
John R Miklos MDAtlanta ~ Beverly Hills ~ Dubai

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.