I would like to have my abdominal apron removed. (photos)

How much fat can safely be removed and what does it cost. I am 60 and healthy.

Doctor Answers 4

Abdominal apron

Hi Aurelia, an abdominoplasty is the surgery you would need. Unfortunately this is no longer covered under Medicare unless following significant weight gain. Costs therefore depend on if this is the case and if so, if you have private health insurance. Contacting a few surgeons for estimates with this information would be a good next step.

Regatds, Dr Steve Merten 

Safe abdominal apron reduction

HI there,

Thank you for your question. It is not possible to quantify the amount of fat that can be safely removed in abdominoplasty surgery, rather we weigh what is removed after the event. More important is that enough abdominal skin is preserved to allow your wound to be closed. That said, I estimate that you could have 2-3kg of apron removed, and probably another 2-3kg removed by concurrent liposuction. The cost varies from city to city and from surgeon to surgeon but could cost anything from $7,000-$15,000.

I hope that helps,

Kind regards,

James

James Southwell-Keely, MD, FRACS
Sydney Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

I would like to have my abdominal apron removed. (photos)

  there are different types of tummy tucks which one is right for me and how are they different from the other? There is a mini tummy tuck, tummy tuck and a vertical abdominoplasty. The appropriate procedure depends the amount and location of the excess skin. That's what your plastic surgeon will have to determine after the actual physical exam.


The recommended BMI is less than 30. This is the recommendation of the American society of plastic surgery. The reason simply, is increased chance of complications. These include but limited to, pulmonary embolus, deep venous thrombosis, delayed wound healing and increase infection rate.


Choose a board certified plastic surgeon who has done a ton of Tummy Tuck and has privileges to do this surgery at a local university hospital. This says his credentials have been checked out by fellow Drs. All surgeries carry risk, talk to your plastic surgeon and choose one wisely.

Many surgeons, including myself, offer online virtual consultations where you send us your photos and we can estimate the cost. I, like many surgeons, also offer free consultations so that you can be examined and given the most accurate quote possible. Please be mindful that the in person physical exam is the most important and could potentially alter your treatment plan.

 

 



I would like to have my abdominal apron removed.

Thank you for the question and pictures.

The tummy tuck operation is an  abdominal wall contouring operation that serves to reapproximate the abdominal wall muscles that have spread with pregnancy and remove the “excess skin” of the lower abdomen.  It is generally consider an "aesthetic" procedure, compared to the panniculectomy operation (involves primarily removal of the lower abdominal wall apron) which may be considered more of a “medically necessary” procedure. 


The panniculectomy operation involves excision of the lower abdominal wall pannus or  overhanging skin/adipose tissue. It is not considered an  aesthetically driven procedure;  it is often performed to help with concerns such as skin breakdown, infections/rashes… 


Costs of surgery will vary from one practice to another and from one region to another as well. You will find some average costs of surgery listed on this website and on individual plastic surgeons' websites as well.


 Ultimately, careful selection of your plastic surgeon will be the most important decision you make. In my practice, I would ask that you obtain "medical clearance" from your primary care physician or internist as well.



I hope this, and the attached link, helps.  Best wishes.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.