Is this a start of an infection? I had a breast augmentation almost a month ago. (photos)

And I had no problems so far except for this one this morning before I took a shower it looked like the first picture after it looked like the second picture it doesn't really hurt but I'm just worried.

Doctor Answers 13

Is this a start of an infection? I had a breast augmentation almost a month ago

Thank you for the photo and question, you will need to visit our surgeon as soon as possible it look lıke you have ınflamation and ıt could get worse.

Breast augmentation

I would see your PS for advice regarding this. You look to have a problem with the wound and the skin edges are inflamed. The crucial thing is that the implant is protected by soft tissue. You need to be examined in person by your PS asap.

Gary L. Ross, MBChB, FRCS
Manchester Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 138 reviews

Incision Worries

Thank you for posting your question and photos. It is best to see your plastic surgeon for an in-person exam and evaluation so that the cause of the skin separation can be thoroughly evaluated. Best wishes.

Benjamin J Cousins MD
Board Certified Plastic Surgeon  

Benjamin J. Cousins, MD
Miami Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Open incision One Month Post Op


Thank you for your question and photo. It is not typical to have an open area like this picture shows one month after surgery. I recommend that you ask your Plastic Surgeon to examine you in person and rule out infection or serious issues.

All the best

Is this a start of an infection? I had a breast augmentation almost a month ago.

Thank you for your question and photographs.  As this wound appears to be enlarging I would recommend seeing your surgeon sooner than later for an in-person evaluation.  With your new implant nearby any wound causes potential compromise and should be investigated.  Best wishes. 

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews


Thanks for the question and photo.  I suggest you get into see your plastic surgeon right away.  A physical exam will be necessary to give you the correct recommendations.  It may just be some superficial breakdown or a reaction to an internal suture, but could also be a deeper, more concerning infection. Good luck!

Jeffrey Umansky, MD
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Breast augmentation - do I have an infection?

Thank you for your question about your breast augmentation.
  • I am sorry to tell you that an open wound a month after a breast augmentation is always a concern.
  • I strongly suggest that you contact your plastic surgery without delay and arrange to be seen.
Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Best wishes. Elizabeth Morgan MD PHD FACS

Best to Be Seen Today

You can develop superficial wounds like yours 4-6 weeks after surgery, and these are usually from absorbable sutures that your body isn't liking.  These absorbable sutures are usually placed deeper in the skin to hold your incision together for 6-8 weeks after surgery.  Your body usually absorbs most of these sutures, but it can push others to the surface of your incision, resulting in a superficial wound like yours.  I do, however, agree with the other plastic surgeons on this forum and think that you should be seen by your plastic surgeon today.  Good luck!

Ryan Marshall, DO
Missoula Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Needs an exam

Alert your surgeon as this is a wound breakdown near a breast implant.
It may stay small, but needs antibiotic ointment to cover it till your visit.

Postop wound opening

Whenever there is an opening, there is risk for implant contamination. Because photos cannot show the depth of the opening, you should see your plastic surgeon who can assess the situation and decide on a course of treatment. Best wishes. 

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.