Is this scarring normal? (Photo)

One scar hasn't healed as nicely as the other and has a blue tint towards the end of it. It might be important to note that this particular breast had a larger implant. Is this okay?

Doctor Answers 10

Normal scars have a variety of appearances

The final appearance of surgical scars can vary greatly and still be considered normal. Even segments of the same scar can look quite without any obvious reason for this. There are a number of proactive strategies that your surgeon can advise you on to help a new or old scar. Some scar treatments and strategies have better clinical evidence to support their use.  A comprehensive approach to scars will include topical products, mechanical strategies, laser and light based therapies that can really make a difference. Fortunately, more time often leads to satisfactory fading and flattening as well. 


Vancouver Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Scar

Thank you for your question.  Scars tend to lighten and flatten as time goes on.  I would recommend scar massage and silicon strips to help soften and flatten the scar.  You can talk to your plastic surgeon about whether they can recommend any other creams or interventions.  All the best,

Keshav Magge, MD
Bethesda Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Scar after breast augmentation

  A patient with elective surgery will have an incision mark or scar from that surgery. This is something that is part and partial of the actual operation.  In many of my patients, I have seen incisions like to one you've photographed.

Scars

Hello,

Thank you for the question and photos. It is typical for scars to appear reddish and darker in the months following surgery. You can expect them to lighten naturally throughout the first year. Your Surgeon may be able to recommend a topical scar treatment for you and I always advise my patients to avoid tanning their scars. Follow up with your Plastic Surgeon,

All the best

Breast augmentation scars

Dear Karen,
The scar does not look worrisome.  It will likely improve over time.  Be sure to show it to your plastic surgeon, so he or she can watch the progress.  Good luck!

Is this breast implant scarring normal?

the scar which is slightly wider and pink may be a hypertrophic scar.  This can often be improved with topical steroids or 1540 non-ablative fractional laser treatments.  Please see your surgeon to discuss further treatment.

Incision issue

If it was a tighter breast with a larger implant, the tension to stretch the tissues could have impacted the resulting scar. You did not say how long it has been from surgery. A scar revision may be reasonable.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Thicker scar

I would revise the thicker scar in the office under local anesthesia as long as you are 6 months after surgery. You benefit from some kenalog injection in the future if it starts to happen after revision procedure. Good Luck!

Gregory T. Lynam, MD
Richmond Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Scarring after BA

Thanks for your question. The discoloration you see in your scar is likely nothing to be worried about. It is likely a suture still dissolving, depending upon how far out you are from surgery. I doubt this is the case for you, but when a breast implant gets very close to a thin scar, it will also have a bluish look, so you should definitely have your surgeon take a look. Best wishes.

Paul J. Leahy, MD
Leawood Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Scarring post BBA

Hi 

The most like;y explanation is that there is a knot of dissolving stitch at one end of this scar. It may dissolve on its own or it may work its way to the surface where it can be trimmed by your PS. It is not anything to worry about. kIf the scar upsets you it could be revised but I would not rush into that.

Best wishes 

Gerard Lambe, MD
Manchester Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.