Curiosity and still trying to understand Botox

I was wondering with the help of Botox and not clenching my jaw will my masseter muscle go back to the way it was before? I had a small sized masseter and bulked it up. My muscle is little bit bigger but nothing too crazy like I see online but it is bigger than before. If I can completely stop my clenching habit and get Botox treatment will my jaw muscle go back to before permanently after a few treatments and Botox wears off?

Doctor Answers 10

Botox and masseter

Masseter muscle will shrink with botox use.  But if you keep clenching as much as you say you do it will likely come back if you do not keep up with botox.


New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Botox for the masseter

Thank you for your question metsfan86. Botox is a purified protein used to address wrinkles associated with facial expression. It can also be used on the masseter muscle used for biting to slim the lower face. Botox can also be used here for those who have TMJ or who grind their teeth. Just like any muscle, the more one uses it, the larger it gets, just like body builders' muscles on the body. If body builders stop lifting weights, their muscles will atrophy, or get smaller. The same thing happens with the masseter muscle in the face. If one uses it more it will get larger, and with less use it will get smaller. But sometimes grinding the teeth can be a difficult habit to stop. Using traditional doses, Botox will relax muscles. For significant atrophy larger doses and multiple treatments may be required. Please consult with a doctor for specific recommendations. Good luck!

Alex Eshaghian, MD, PhD
Encino Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Botox to Thin Jawline?

You're already ahead of the game by realizing that the clenching habit must stop if you're going to get a long-term/permanent result. If you completely stop clenching in combination with Botox treatments you can decrease the size of your masseter muscles. You may want to consider going to your dentist for a customized biteguard to keep you from clenching. Though it may take longer, this intervention in and of itself may help you get back to your baseline as you are not continuously exercising the muscle (same concept as a muscle anywhere else on your body). Adding Botox to the biteguard may hasten the result you're looking for. Best of luck!

Millicent Odunze-Geers, MD, MPH
Sacramento Physician
4.6 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Masseter and Botox

Botox will make the masseter smaller and if you stop clenching your teeth it will continue to be small; however, that is the hard part. you might try biofeedback

Melvin Elson, MD
Nashville Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Masseter slimming with Botox

Dear metsfan86:

This is a complex concern! Botox may be used to visually reduce masseter hypertrophy but it does not take care of its cause and therefore will return. There are many factors to consider:
  1. at least 4 muscles which clench the jaw: masseter, temporalis, internal and external pterygoids
  2. many behavioral or emotional concerns
  3. jaw disorders including progressive tooth disorders
  4. jaw joint disorders
  5. dietary issues
  6. and others. 

If one area of the masseter is injected and reduces in size, other areas will hypertrophy if the other causes are not attended to. 

Consult with a well experienced, interested, Board Certified Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon with TMJ experience to properly assess the causes of masseteric hypertrophy. Consult with a well experienced, interested, Board Certified Plastic Surgeon, OMFS, Facial ENT or Dermatology injector for your Botox injection.

I wish you the best!

Dean P. Kane, MD, FACS
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 70 reviews

Botox and Masserter Muscle

Botox works by relaxing muscles.  The masseter muscle that helps with clenching your jaw is relaxed by Botox.  For that reason Botox can help your type of problem in two ways.  First it reduces clenching (if you use a muscle less, it gets smaller).  Second it directly makes the muscle look smaller because it is not contracting as often (think of your biceps when you flex that muscle).

You best bet is to be evaluated with a doctor who is very experienced with Botox treatments. 

Marc Cohen, MD
Philadelphia Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Botox injection to the masseter muscle will improve jawline contour for up to a year

Some people just have large masseter muscles. However, chronic clenching and grinding of the teeth can cause the masseter muscle to enlarge or hypertrophy. (Think of it like exercising a body muscle.)
Botox injections to the masseter muscle are quite easy to undergo and the risks are minimal in trained hands. After injection, the muscle hypertrophy to gradually improve, but it may take up to 6 weeks to see the final results. I usually see my patients 6 weeks after the first injection to assess if touch up treatments are needed because some patients have more muscle bulk and require higher doses of Botox. The nice thing about masseter injections is that the results can last 6 to 12 months. 

Theda C. Kontis, MD
Baltimore Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Botox masseter

Hello and thank you for your question. Botox for masseteric hypertrophy can be very effective. The most important aspect is to find a surgeon you are comfortable with. I recommend that you seek consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you in person.

Best wishes and good luck.

Richard G. Reish, M.D.
Harvard-trained plastic surgeon

Richard G. Reish, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 80 reviews

Muscles recover

Muscles recover after botox treatments wear off.
Masseter is great for helping with jaw clenching and is very popular.

Botox injection to masseters

Botox injection to the masseters helps reduce masseter size/bulk. For this reason, the treatment is often used to contour the lower face. However, you will need to continue to get repeat treatments every 3-6 months to maintain the results.  

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.