I am 215lbs since I have had my son and I am 4'11''. Is it safe for me to have liposuction?

About Liposuction

Doctor Answers 10

It would be better to lose some weight before undergoing liposuction in order to get the best results.

It would be better to lose some weight before undergoing liposuction in order to get the best results. Liposuction is not a weight loss tool, and while it can help to act as a “kick-start” to a healthier lifestyle, it is better to be at or near a healthy weight that you can maintain before having liposuction. Remember that liposuction can only treat subcutaneous fat under the skin - for visceral fat around your organs, diet and exercise are the only way to reduce it. If you think you can’t lose weight on your own, consider seeing a nutritionist and personal trainer to help you get on track. After you’re a little bit closer to your goal weight, visit a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon for a consultation to come up with a custom liposuction plan for you. 


San Diego Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Liposuction and Techniques -- SmartLipo Versus VASER Versus Traditional Versus WAL Versus ThermiRF

I suggest a formal consultation with an expert who can look at your body and assess your medical history to determine liposuction safety.  Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 168 reviews

I am 215lbs since I have had my son and I am 4'11''. Is it safe for me to have liposuction?

Based on your height and weight, your BMI is 43.4.  This makes it unsafe to proceed with elective surgery and increases your risks in regards to anesthesia, surgical healing and deep vein thrombosis.  Try to get your BMI under 35 if possible before considering elective cosmetic surgery.  Good luck.

Zachary Farris, MD, FACS
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

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I am 215lbs since I have had my son and I am 4'11''. Is it safe for me to have liposuction?

Hello Almyra,
Thanks for your question.
Unfortunately, it is not safe for you to have elective surgery like liposuction.  Your anesthesia risks are too great for safe surgery.  You would have to lose a tremendous amount of weight to be considered a safe surgery candidate.  Save you money and work on diet, exercise, and stress management to attain a healthier weight that could support elective cosmetic surgery.
Good luck,
Dr. Shah

Manish H. Shah, MD, FACS
Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

I am 215lbs since I have had my son and I am 4'11''. Is it safe for me to have liposuction?

This is a common question we get because the thought of sucking out fat seems like a good idea for an overweight patient. It Is Not! Surgery of an elective cosmetic nature is unsafe for patients with a BMI over 35 and liposuction to remove 10 pounds is enough to put a patient in the ICU for days and it has even cost patients their lives in some instances.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Liposuction

Liposuction is not a weight loss procedure and works best in patients with limited amounts of fat deposits.  Having a BMI > 30 increases your risk for complications. 

John Burns, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Liposuction for weight loss

Thank you for asking about your liposuction.

  • It is tempting to try liposuction to improve one's shape when one is overweight.
  • But unless you are already able to lose weight on your own, the result will be disappointing -
  • You will temporarily lose at most 10 pounds and soon you gain back all the fat. 
  • Your BMI (a calculation based on your height and weight, is over 43 - cosmetic surgery is best when patients have a BMI under 30 and generally not recommended if the BMI is 40 or higher.
  • I strongly suggest that you get help from your doctor and a nutritionist on exercise and calorie restriction -
  • And if you cannot lose weight, ask for a referral to a bariatric surgeon for a possible gastric bypass.
  • After you lose weight, you may need surgery to re-tighten your skin - contouring liposuction can then be done at the same time,
  • Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Hope you find this information helpful. Best wishes

Liposuction and BMI

Your BMI is high, and normally a person must have a BMI under 30 if they are going to get the best results from any kind of body contouring. It would help if you would post a picture, but just based on the numbers alone, my suspicion is that you will do best if you attempt a trial of diet and exercise to get your weight down before proceeding with any elective cosmetic procedure. Always go with a surgeon certified by the American Board plastic surgery.
Best of luck!
Dr. Subbio
Board-Certified Plastic Surgeon
Newtown Square/Philadelphia, PA

Christian Subbio, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Safety of liposuction in the high BMI patient.

Liposuction can safely be perform. Aesthetically the best outcome would be a combination of weight loss followed by liposuction for areas of unwanted fat. This may not be practical however liposuction can be performed safely as an independent procedure.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Liposuction - Am I A Candidate Or Do I Need To Lose Weight?

Thank you for your question.  You will need to lose weight prior to any cosmetic surgery procedure. The best way to do this is with a strict diet and exercise program. Please see your primary care physician for guidance to help you achieve your weight loss goals. It is important to be at a stable, healthy weight prior to proceeding with surgery. Please consult with a board certified plastic surgeon who specializes in body contouring to discuss what can be realistically achieved with liposuction or tummy tuck surgeries. Hope this helps.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.