Can my Botox issue be rectified? (Photo)

I've had two sessions of Botox (the last being Jan this year) and I seem to now have, what I can only describe as a puffy part on my forehead. Most noticible when I raise my forehead. It's puffy to touch, though doesn't cause me any discomfort. Is this something that can be rectified? Many Thanks, Sammy

Doctor Answers 8

Puffy forehead

Thank you for your question SamanthaL1990. I am sorry to hear about the puffiness on your forehead. Most people enjoy the results of their Botox treatments for three to four months after a Botox treatment. This may not be associated with Botox. I recommend consulting with a doctor who can perform an examination for specific advice. Good luck!

Encino Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Botox issue

Being that it is 6 months post botox it is unlikely that it is related.  See your physician and rule out possible abcess.

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 414 reviews

Puffy Forehead after BOTOX

Your last Botox treatment was 6 months ago. This is probably not related to the Botox. I would have your forehead checked out by your doctor to rule out a lipoma.

Brian Maloney, MD, FACS
Atlanta Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Can a Botox issue be rectified

Thanks for your photograph and question. It would be high unlike that a Botox injection given 5-6 months ago would be creating a puffy area.  Best to return to your injector for follow-up or to consult with an experienced, certified injector to evaluate.  Wish you the best.

Botox and Puffy Forehead

The Botox should pretty much be worn off now as it's been 6 months. Difficult to say what that puffiness may be without evaluating you in person. If you do have some residual Botox remaining, it may not have been injected symmetrically and that might be your muscle bunching up when you raise your brows. Also, it may make you feel better to know that faces are not perfectly symmetric. You may be studying your face more after injections than before you had injections. Perhaps that puffiness was always there, but just not noticed? Discuss your concerns with your injector as s/he may have more insight as they've actually evaluated you in person and also hopefully have some before and after photos from the first time you had Botox injected.

Millicent Odunze-Geers, MD, MPH
Sacramento Physician
4.6 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Can my Botox issue be rectified?

Thank you for your question and I am sorry to hear of your botox issues.  Without an in-person examination it is difficult to offer definite recommendations but you may have had asymmetrical placement of your botox where a segment of the muscle responsible for creating the "11's" was not paralyzed so that when you try to make that action one side is working, creating the lump, while the other is not.  Other possibilities include a small blood collection termed a hematoma, but these are typically painful.  See your injector for a follow up visit to discuss your current results. 

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Puffiness after Botox...

Thank you for your question.  It is difficult to tell in the picture what exactly is going on.  This may be due to many causes like infection, hematoma formation, serum, etc.  It is best to follow up with your Board Certified Dermatologist for proper evaluation and management.  Regards, Dr. Matt Elias

Matthew Elias, DO, FAAD
Fort Lauderdale Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Can Botox issue be rectified?

It is difficult to determine what might be causing the puffy area of your forehead, following your Botox treatments, without examining you.  Any potential treatment to try and improve the issue would be dependent on the cause.  If you have not already done so, I would recommend returning to the physician who treated you so that you can be evaluated in person.  

Michael I. Echavez, MD
San Francisco Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.