I Am Schedule to Have a Tummy Tuck with Breast Lift. Doc Says I May End Up Having a T Scar After? (photo)

My doctor is not sure but told me that I may end up having a T scar after the full tummy tuck due to not having a enough skin to pull it through. I am very concern. Is there any way somebody can tell me based on my picture if I would end up having the T section for tummy tuck or it is completely unknown until I am under the procedure. I just don’t want to have a surprise. Would really appreciate any help and advice. I am 36 year old, 124lb and overall in a very good health.

Doctor Answers 23

About the Procedure Techniques and Scarring

The Mommy Makeover is a combination of procedures to bring a woman’s body back to the way she looked prior to pregnancy. Most commonly some variation of a #TummyTuck and #BreastSurgery are performed. Additional procedures can include liposuction, umbilical hernia repair.  The most common #breastprocedures include #mastopexy or #breastlift, #breastaugmentation, or #breastreduction.  #MummyTummy is a term given to modified tummy tucks which can use liposuction and skin tightening with radiofrequency such Vanquish, Vela3, thermage, thermiRF and others. The actual fat contouring can be done non-surgically as well with #UltraShape or Cool-Sculpting.  

Your procedures should be performed by a #PlasticSurgeon who is board-certified and has a great deal of experience specializing in cosmetic #surgery. You will then greatly improve your chances of getting the result you desire, and, without the need for a revision surgery. It is suggested that you look at before and after photos of the surgeons actual patients, and read patient reviews. Gathering all of this information will help you make a well-informed decision.

Your #healing will continue for 2-3 months following the procedure(s) as the #scars will be evolving. If my patients have concerns that something is unusual about their healing process, it is important for them to call the office and discuss these concerns or come in to be examined. Also some severe scars can be treated with re-excision, laser, kenalog/5-FU injections, creams, silicone strips and other methods to reduce and improve healing. Additionally, scar therapy with scar maturation products (e.g. BioCorneum or Embrace) are suggested for managing scars. However, we recommend you wait to use scar improving products until a few weeks following your surgery.

If you have concerns about your #healing, or pain that you question to be unusual, it is important to call your plastic surgeon to discuss these further asked to be examined.



Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Talk with your surgeon regarding concerns....

Your pictures demonstrate redundant abdominal wall tissue and weakened abdominal muscles in the presence of a high umbilicus.  When this situation arises the surgeon may have to make compromises when performing abdominoplasty surgery.

                In your case, it may not be possible to stretch the abdominal skin from the umbilicus to the transverse incision.  When this scenario arises, a small midline vertical incision may be necessary to close the umbilical transposition site.  Unfortunately, this decision often needs to be made in the operating room and is based upon intra-operative factors. 

                It’s appropriate for your surgeon to make you aware of this possibility.  If you’re concerned about this issue, it’s important to spend additional time with your surgeon so all your questions are answered.

Possible T scar

A small T scar is a possibility in your case due to your belly button being higher on your abdomen.  Your surgeon is trying to be open with you and let you know what you may expect to see after surgery.

Mennen T. Gallas, MD
Katy Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Inverted T incision after Tummy Tuck

    Your belly button is high, and your plastic surgeon is obligated to tell you that the belly button may not be removed - leaving a small vertical scar where it used to lie on the skin.

Unlikely but if present it would be very small and near your pubic bone

Hello,

Thank your for the question and the photos.  There is a possibilty that your current belly button location may not be able to be excised because of insufficient laxity but this is not likely the case.  If this occurs the circular defect of the skin where your current belly button is located will be closed as a vertical incision and it will be located near your pubic bone.  Regardless, if planned and executed properly you should have a very nice result.  I would recommend liposuction of the abdomen as well as abdominal wall tightening.  Please note that some plastic surgeons do not agree on the liposuction part in terms of safety but I have found this to be a safe and powerfully rewarding part of the tummy tuck result.

All the best,

Dr Remus Repta

Remus Repta, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 154 reviews

T Scar After TT

A small vertical incision can be needed in TT if the skin from the lower part of the breast bone to the navel does not have enough laxity to reach down to the main incision, In that setting, the hole from the navel must be closed, since it will not be removed as part of the excess. 

It is possible to avoid this by making the main scar higher, but to me that makes no sense, because the entire scar is now higher. Often the vertical part can be excised a year later as a minor touch up procedure once the TT is healed and the skin relaxes a bit. 

I can't tell one way or the other based upon the photos. They do not tell me how stretchable the skin is.

Thanks, best wishes.

"T" scars for tummy tuck

the "T" scar is the small scar that rises up from the horizontal tummy tuck scar.  You get it when there is not enough loose skin above the belly button to allow the skin around the belly button to be completely removed. It usually heals very well and is not usually very long. Sometimes the surgeon can't tell 100% before surgery. Sounds like your surgeon is being honest with you. Good luck.

Tummy tuck with "T" scar

If you had  a "T" scar it would most likely be a small vertical incision but you should clarify that with  your PS.  The vertical incision is from closure of your old belly button and usually heals very well.  Better to have that short vertical scar than to pull up your pubic hair with excessive tension or have a high transverse scar.

Robert Kearney, MD, FACS
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

T scar after tummy tuck

A t shaped scar is a rare situation after a tummy tuck. There are two groups of patients who will tend to have this. The first is a patient who is relatively skinny and doesn't have enough skin stretch to perform a full tummy tuck. The second group are patients that have a very high riding belly button. I think that this is what your surgeon is concerned about in your case. Judging from your pictures, I think it is unlikely that you will need this because you appear to have a fair amount of extra skin. While it is unlikely, you need to be prepared for this. If a short vertical scar is something that you absolutely do not want, then I would not recommend this surgery for you. Good luck in making your decision.

T scar after tummy tuck

Based on your photos, I have not had to use the T scar tummy tuck in your kind of situation as you have enough loose skin to perform a tummy tuck with a horizontal scar.  Some patients with a high belly button may have a short scar from the hole that is created from the incision around the belly button and perhaps this is what your surgeon is considering.  However, based on your photos alone, I feel that this would not be necessary.  It is very difficult to ascertain your situations through these photographs alone.  If you are still concerned, I would seek a second opinion with a board-certified plastic surgeon before proceeding with your surgery.

 

 

Shim Ching, MD
Honolulu Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.