I have one eye that I think is hooded and another that isn't. Can I fix this problem? (Photo)

Hi. To my knowledge, I was born with one hooded eye and I have recently noticed a difference in my eyes, especially since my face has become more defined. I am sure I was born with my current eye situation because I could see it in pictures that were taken of me as a child. I am 21 and I have two questions: 1) Is my eye hooded or is there something else wrong? 2) Can I fix this problem? I do not know if anyone notices it but it bothers me.

Doctor Answers 8

Asymmetric eyelid folds

Lack of an upper eyelid crease can be congenital (often in Asian eyelids), or can develop over time as part of the aging process.  In your case, you appear to have a congenital absence of the left fold.  A simple procedure performed under local anesthesia can restore a symmetric fold to your upper lids.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Hooded eye

Thank you for your photo! It does appear that you have slightly hooded eye. If this has occurred since childhood and has not gotten significantly worse or changed, then it becomes less likely that there is insidious cause. It is best to have an in office examination by a plastic surgeon to determine your specific anatomy and the functions of your muscles as well as the quality of the surrounding tissue. This can definitely be improved to better match the other side although you may require surgery on both eyes to maximize the symmetry. Hope this helps!


Johnson C. Lee, MD Plastic Surgery

Johnson C. Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Eyelid hooding

Thank you for your question and photos.  It's not possible to tell for sure from the single photo you presented, but it's more likely that the muscle that opens your eye inserts differently on the left than the right.  A physical exam would be necessary to differentiate this from simply excess skin on the left.  Either way, there are procedures that can improve the symmetry.  All the best!

Sirius K. Yoo, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

I have one eye that I think is hooded and another that isn't. Can I fix this problem?

You have excess skin on your upper lids- it can be corrected with an upper lid blepharoplasty. For more info you can view this link:

Eyelids

Thank you for the photos and there is.a difference in your eyelids that can be corrected with surgery.  So go on some complimentary consultations with expert in the area and become informed how after an examination.


Dr. Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

You have some facial asymmetry that contributes to this difference.

However there is also right upper eyelid ptosis with increased platform show on the right side.  A detailed personal consultation is needed to determine your best options here.  I suspect that you would benefit from surgery on both upper eyelids.  Less is more.  Surgery should be about structure not subtraction of stuff.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Asymmetric upper eyelids (photo)

Anatomically, connective tissue fibers between your levator aponeurosis (musculo-tendinous apparatus that opens your eyes) and the skin of your upper lids are at a higher level on the side of your eyelid crease.  To establish a visible crease on the "hooded" side so they both have a similar appearance, a one hour office blepharoplasty procedure will secure hooded skin to your aponeurosis just above your lashes.  

Steve Laverson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

I have one eye that I think is hooded and another that isn't. Can I fix this problem?

Asymmetric fullness of the upper lids is not uncommon and can be cosmetically improved with a number of surgical options depending on individual anatomy and desired outcome.

Following the advice of anyone who would presume to tell you what to do based on a limited photo and more importantly without taking a full medical history, examining… SHOW MORE you, feeling and assessing your tissue tone, discussing your desired outcome and fully informing you about the pros and cons of each option would not be in your best interest.  Find a plastic surgeon that you are comfortable with and one that you trust and listen to his or her advice. The surgeon should be certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and ideally a member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS). You should discuss your concerns with that surgeon in person.

Robert Singer, MD FACS

La Jolla, California

Robert Singer, MD
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.