How much (typically) is a breast lift with saline implants going to cost in the San Antonio, TX area?

Doctor Answers 6

Saline aug cost in San Antonio

All in, and that means including anesthesia, facility, implant, and surgeon, it should be a bit over $5000.  Anything notably less than that and I would be a little bit suspicious.


Good luck!


San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Cost of Breast Lift with Implants

Costs will depend on several factors: the geographic location, the skill and experience of the surgeon, and operating room and anesthesia fees.  Different implants may have different costs. Approximate costs can be found on the Real Self website, Surgery.org, or PlasticSurgery.org.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

How much (typically) is a breast lift with saline implants going to cost?

Thank you for the question. 

When it comes to cost of surgery, there may be many “variables” involved. The specific surgeon's credentials/experience level (or lack thereof), the specific geographic area you are looking at, the different operations available, the location of the procedure ( quality of surgery facility), type/quality of anesthesia provider, type of breast implants… are some of the potential variables involved. You will find average costs of surgery listed on this website, and on individual plastic surgeon's websites as well.



In regards to outcome of the planned procedure, more important than costs of the procedures will be careful selection of your plastic surgeon. I would suggest starting with the American Society of Plastic Surgery and/or the Aesthetic Society of Plastic Surgery to obtain a list of well experienced board-certified plastic surgeons. Then, I would suggest you visit a few surgeons whose practices concentrate on aesthetic surgery. ***Ask to SEE lots of examples of their work AND preferably speak/see patients who have had similar procedures done. Be very careful with your decision-making. You will find, while doing your due diligence, that there are many different “specialties” who will offer their services to you; again, I strongly recommend you concentrate on surgeons certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.  



I would also suggest that you do not base your selection of plastic surgeon primarily on costs of surgery; keep in mind that revisionary surgery may be more costly in many ways.  I hope this, and the attached link, helps. Best wishes.

Cost of Breast Lift and Saline Implants?

Seems like a simple question, but as you can see from the answers, the answer can be complicated.  I would recommend you see a few plastic surgeons to get their opinions.  Pricing will vary depending on what is required.

If you go with large implants you might be able to get by without any skin reduction surgery. In which case the cost will be less.

If you only have a small amount of excess skin or droop you may only need a small lift.

If you have a lot of droop, you may be better off with 2 operations.

In any of these scenarios I would suggest you look at the new Structured Saline Implant - the IDEAL IMPLANT.  This has a much more natural feel and appearance than the traditional Saline Implant.  It is more expensive, but it is the latest in Implant Technology and well worth the extra cost.

Hope that helps some.  To get an idea of our overall pricing and costs of plastic surgery check out the link below.

Suresh Koneru, MD
San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Pricing of a lift with implant

Thanks for your inquiry, while getting an approximate price for an augmentation is easy---getting a price for an augmentation with lift is more challenging without an exam or consultation because different types of lifts change the price.  I suggest you go get few in person consultations. 

Seek a personal consultation for the right operative plan

You should see someone to have a proper evaluation.   You may only need an implant.  An implant with a lift is not a good idea.

A lift with an implant is controversial for two reasons.  First, when you perform a lift you are making everything tight and closing the wounds under tension.  It you add the expansive forces of the implant at the same time, you are fighting against yourself.  There are forces on the wound which try to make them separate, which results in wider, thicker, more irregular scars.  In the worst case, the wounds will open.  So compromises are usually made in the operating room by the surgeon because they cannot close the lift wounds over the appropriate sized implant.  Either less of a lift is performed so that the skin is not as tight and therefore there is less tension on the closure.  Or a smaller implant than would be appropriate is used so as to decrease the expansive forces.  Either way, you are compromising the aesthetic outcome.  Often the outcome is so compromised that a second revision surgery is required.  If however, you plan to have the lift first and then the augmentation after everything has healed, then you have two operation that are planned, both with much lower risk than the combined mastopexy/augmenation.  The outcomes of the two meticulously planned operations are much better and a more aesthetically pleasing, and a safer outcome is achieved.

The second reason the combination of mastopexy and augmentation is controversial is because of the risk of nipple necrosis (death of the nipple).  By making the skin tight for the lift, you are putting external pressure on the veins that supply the nipple.  By putting an expansive force on the undersurface of the breast with an implant, you are putting pressure on the thin walled veins that supply the nipple.  If the pressure by squeezing the veins between the implant and the skin is greater than the venous pressure in the veins, the flow will stop.  If the venous outflow stops, the arterial inflow is stopped.  If the arterial inflow is stopped, there is no oxygen for the healing wounds and the tissue dies.

Placing the implant on top of the muscle in combination with a lift puts the blood supply to the nipple at a much higher risk because in addition to the issue of pressure on the veins, you have to divide the blood vessels that are traveling from the pectoralis muscle directly into the breast (and to the nipple) in order to place the implant between the breast tissue and the muscle. This adds a third element of risk to an already risky operation.  Mastopexy/augmenation with sub glandular implant placement is by far the riskiest way to address your anatomic question.


These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.