Deflation of saline implants while breastfeeding, with intent to explant after weaning. How long can they be left in?

Have 8 y/o saline implants under muscle.Since successfully nursed 1st child up to 20 months,currently nursing 2nd child at 11 months.I'm 1 cup size larger than when I nursed 1st child,yet 20 lbs lighter.Felt my implants were too large to begin with.Size/weight of breasts have been causing neck/back pain.Exercise hasn't resolved pain,only hindered by breasts.Would like them deflated ASAP.Prefer not to wean child before she is ready.Could I have them deflated then explanted after fully weaning?

Doctor Answers 8

Removing deflated saline filled implants as an elective procedure

There is no problem at all delaying your explant sugery for deflated saline filled implants.  The procedure can be done electively under local anesthesia.  


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Deflation of saline implants

I have seen several cases of mold biotoxin disease from deflated saline implants that were left in.  This is more commonly known as fibromyalgia and treatment is explantation with total capsulectomy, antifungals, and biotoxin detox.  Most women also need immune and endocrine support.  They also remain very sensitive to mold in the future.

Susan Kolb, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Deflating saline breast implants

Saline breast implants can easily be deflated under local anesthesia. It is important this be done under sterile conditions to minimize the risk of infection. The implants can then be left in until your baby is weaned. Find a board certified plastic surgeon and discuss this with them.

How long can deflated saline implants stay.

If you are considering having your implants deflated, make sure it is done under sterile conditions.  You do not want to risk getting an infection.  After deflation, the implants can stay in as long as your schedule requires.  Keep in mind that sometimes the deflated implant can cause discomfort.
Best of luck.

Suresh Koneru, MD
San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Can saline implants be deflated and left in for a period of time?

This sounds like it would be beneficial to you to deflate you saline implants but it is very important that it be performed carefully to minimize the risk of infection. This risk is low but if it were to occur you may need to go to the operating room to remove your implants. Depending on the size of your implants there may be a significant change in the size and shape of your breasts. I recommend you see a board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you, go over your history and recommend a course of treatment for you.

I hope this helps.

Dr Edwards

Deflated implants during breast feeding not an issue

Thank you for your question.

You may certainly have your implants deflated now then have them removed after weaning for best results. Make certain that you are no longer lactating and wear extra snug sports bra to encourage skin shrinkage after weaning. Don't panic if you find that you have an excess amount of skin afterwards. This will make you an excellent candidate for the Ultimate Breast Lift technique which requires no implant and no vertical scar incision.

Best wishes,
Gary Horndeski M.D.

Gary M. Horndeski, MD
Texas Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 209 reviews

Deflation

The answer is Yes you could have the implants deflated and /or if deflated wIt till completing breast feeding before having them explanted.

Dr Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

A deflated saline implant can be left in place indefinitely.

There is no harm with leaving a failed saline implant in position indefinitely. You should wait until breast-feeding is complete before having the problem surgically solved.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.