Saline Slightly over Filled on Small Breast, Thin Frame - is This Right?

I saw a surgeon who recommended saline 275cc slightly overfilled (under muscle) to minimise rippling I am 100lb and 5.3 with very petite frame but do work out and have good pec muscle, he said. I am only a 34 n/a and dont have a lot of stetch, plus work out so only want large B, (proportionate). I can see my ribs all the way down my sternum will i still have that? Every answer here points to silicone though I am still worried about ruptures and am also looking into the gummy bear implant.

Doctor Answers 14

Overfilled saline implants

You are really tiny.  I think a 275 might be a little too big if you only want a B cup.  Overfilling is a really good idea to minimize rippling as is putting the implants under the muscle.  I also use only smooth implants.  I have found the textured ones tend to ripple more.  I also tend to use low profile implants on thin patients who want some cleavage and lateral fullness but don't want too much projection.  But the best way to minimize rippling is to go with smooth gels under the muscle.  I'm not so sure the "gummy bears" are going to be that great but time will tell.

 

Lisa Lynn Sowder, M.D.


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Saline breast implants in a thin patient

Saline breast implants are more prone to rippling/wrinkling, especially in a thin patient.  Silicone implants are less likely to have visible signs of rippling.  True gummy bear implants are made of a harder silicone and are available in the US only under certain clinical trials. These have a low incidence of rippling.  You can try to overfill a saline implant, however, rippling can still occur.

The rupture rate with silicone implants at ten years is about 3%.  Based on your description, you may benefit from silicone implants.

You may want to consult with more than one board certified plastic surgeon for another opinion.

Best wishes,

Dr. Bruno

William Bruno, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 318 reviews

Saline vs silicone

I don't think there is any question you should go with silicone.I tell my patients that the less tissue you have the more you need silicone.So go with silicone.It is safe and will give you a better result.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 53 reviews

Overfilling saline implants is OK, within reason

Overfilling saline implants is safe to do as long as the volume does not exceed the manufacturer's recommendation for maximum allowed volume. Depending on the manufacturer, the volume maximum for a saline implant is probably about 50cc. Exceeding the recommended volume maximum can lead to fatigue of the implant shell and a higher liklihood of rupture.

Kevin Brenner, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Breast enlargement

It sounds like you are a candidate for breast implants,silicone, placed under the muscle. This will decrease the chances of seeing and feeling the implant in someone as thin as you. We are offering an unbeatable allinclusive special at this time. Watch my videos.

Edward J. Domanskis, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Saline vs silicone gel implants with a thin frame.

You should definitely go with silicone gel or gummy bear implants in order to minimize the possibility of rippling.  The gel implants are unlikely to rupture and feel softer.  I would recommend submuscular placement even though you work out regularly.  This should, at least partially, camouflage the prominence of your ribs.

Kenneth L. Stein, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Saline implants or silicone on a small frame (5'3, 100lbs)?

Since you are quite petite and don’t wish to be excessively large, then a 250cc or 275cc saline prostheses in a submuscular position is certainly reasonable. Although the majority of the augmentations that I presently perform are with cohesive gel silicone, it does surprise some patients that for over 14 years, surgeons were limited to utilizing only saline prostheses. The vast majority of those cases had nice results and the vast majority of women were quite satisfied. Saline prostheses placed submuscularly do have a higher incidence of palpable rippling than silicone but if there is a strong concern over silicone leakage ( which is quite low) then your present choice is quite appropriate and you should enjoy an excellent result.

Saline Implants Should be Overfilled

I feel that saline implants should essentially always be overfilled as the incidence of rippling is too high if they are not.  I also feel that a silicone implant placed under the muscle will give you (and most women) a better result.

John Whitt, MD (retired)
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Overfilling implants

Saline implants can be overfilled for just this effect.  Silicone are prone to ripple less, and placing them under the muscle may help as well.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Breast implant and ripipling

Thank you for your question. Rippling can be seen when the surface of an implant shadows through the tissue, often found where the breast tissue coverage is thin. It can happen in one or both breasts. Some implant styles are more prone such as an overfilled saline implant. Others are less prone such as a shaped silicone implant. So one approach is to choose an implant to one that is less prone to rippling. Another approach would be to add some thickness to the breast tissue. This can be done by fat grafting where fat is carefully layered between the skin and the implant. Another is to add a dermal matrix sheet between the breast and the implant where the rippling is visible to blunt the impression of the implant on the overlying skin.

I would visit with a board certified plastic surgeon to discuss your options in more detail.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.