Infini and Stretch marks. (photo)

What is my realistic result in receiving this treatment? How much of a difference will I see? How visible will the stretch marks be after 3 treatments? 6 treatments?

Doctor Answers 4

Stretch marks and infini

Abdominal stretch marks are very difficult to treat and there is no good answer. If you decide on some treatment, you must be very realistic about the outcome. Infini will minimally improve this problem, but there is no large studies showing the percent of improvement. I would also look into Thermi RF. With infini, I would expect at least 4 treatments.

Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Realistic Results Take a Combination Approach for Stretch Marks

It's hard to say how many sessions you'll need as everyone's body reacts and heals differently. Treating stretch marks successfully takes a combination approach. Stretch marks can be improved with lasers, microneedling/PRP, medical tattooing. See an expert. Best, Dr. Emer

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 158 reviews

Stretch Marks and Infini? ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS NJ

In My opinion, stretch marks respond to Infini , traditional microneedling, ablative and non ablative lasers. In my experience, three treatments are necessary. We like to combine the treatment with PRP. Good luck. 

Jeffrey Rapaport, MD
Englewood Dermatologic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Hypopigmented stretch marks

This is a difficult problem to fix. You have the atrophic scars (stretch marks) that are hypopigmented (loss of pigment). Both are tough and I would not put your expectations high. I think Infini, PRP, microneedling, maybe medical tattoo will be helpful, but probably not what you want. It will require 5 or more treatments and will be expensive as well (in the 2-3000) range I imagine. It is a very large surface area as well.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

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