Will I be able to tell if I damaged my breast augmentation?

I had my BA done Thursday and flew home the 4th day/Monday. I was able to get help on all but the last leg where I had to lift my bag myself into the bin, it's relatively heavy. When lifting I felt the same sharp clenching sensation that I feel when I try to open my pill bottle my self or open a heavy door. I'm not in any pain now just wondering if I may have caused internal damage and if there are signs.

Doctor Answers 6

1 Week Post Op

Lifting luggage and items over the head is something that I ask my patients to avoid for a time post op. Although uncomfortable, you may not have done any damage. If you see any changes in the breast, increased firmness, swelling, bruising or feel increased pain then I recommend that you be assessed in person.
All the best

Ask your surgeon

You should check with your surgeon as only your surgeon would know the exact procedure performed and your medical history.

Damage to breast implant

Dear slim thick In general if you do injure your breast implants that early after surgery you would perceive a change in the appearance of the breast or you would have swelling and possibly pain in the breast. it sounds like you're not having any visible or noticeable changes in your breast and based on that most likely have not injured yourself. You should take the time to make sure you avoid placing yourself in a situation were you are at risk of injuring yourself. Congratulations on having had your surgery. 

Afshin Parhiscar, MD
Bay Area Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

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Did I damage my breast augmentation?

When concerned, the best answer would be to be evaluated by a surgeon in person. I advise my patients to take it easy and minimize their activity for a week after surgery (no sex, etc.). Those patients who use their arms a lot (nurses, bartenders, etc.) usually go back to work by the 14th day, albeit a little sore but manageable. They are usually good to return to fuller arm activities by the third week. For upper body weights, etc. it's wise to hold off until the 6th week. 
I further advise my patients that they should "listen to" their body as far as what activities they can do after the third week. At four days after surgery, the discomfort you had was definitely your body saying, "I'm not ready for this activity yet". For more information on this and similar topics I recommend a plastic surgery Q&A book like "The Scoop On Breasts: A Plastic Surgeon Busts the Myths." Hope this info helps. 

Ted Eisenberg, DO, FACOS
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Signs of hurting your procedure

would be instant changes in the appearances of your breast, like swelling or intractable pains.  Anything else is just a symptom without a problem.  Surprised no one would help you on the last leg of your trip... but without changes in the breast itself, its unlikely anything happened.  You can always send photos to your surgeon but curious as to why you would travel when there are so many good surgeons locally?  When you add the costs of travel, it would negate any financial incentive in most cases.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
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Will I be able to tell if I damaged my breast augmentation? = is breast asymmetric, possibly #BA #breastaugmentation

After breast augmentation, patients should comply with the activity restrictions, specially if the implants were placed under the muscle..
In a  sub muscular breast augmentation, the muscle connects to the arm. Therefore, certain activities of the arm, can activate the muscle to the point that it can cause miss position of the breast implant, resulting in asymmetry.
Patients should avoid carrying anything heavy than 5 pounds or lifting their arms above the shoulder level for at least 6-8 weeks after surgery.

John Mesa, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.