Face/neck lift. Looked good at 3 weeks but I developed a hematoma. What do I do now? Do I need a revision specialist? (Photo)

Face and neck lift, was looking good at 3 weeks,..dont know the kind of face lift that was done.i did have a hematoma develop on rt. . do I need a revision specialist ? And how do I find one? Also will I be more likely to have hematoma again since I had it before? Lost all confidence in PS. so don't tell me to go back. The DR. Thinks all is well and still healing!!! After a year? Dying to get this fixed so bad I will go anywhere and do anything! Thanks to all for your time.

Doctor Answers 15

Hematoma after face lift

it seems you had a hematoma drained before 3 weeks, looked good at 3 weeks and now do not like the result.
If you do not like your plastic surgoen, get a second opinion from a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Take your operative note and before/after photos as well as copies of your medical record - it will help the new surgeon give you the best possible advice. Best wishes.


Any surgeon who does any volume of facelifts has the occassional hematoma - probably at a rate of around 3%. Never know ahead of time who falls into that group. You would need to be examined to determine whether or not an actual "re-do" is necessary for the improvement you want or whether perhaps some other procedure(s) would suffince. Often times, in my Miami practice, I find that a combination of lesser procedures is ery satisfactory. But, if an entire "re-do" is necessary, then that is what is recommended.

Robert H. Hunsaker, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Revision facelift

Hematomas sometimes occur after facelift procedures.  Unfortunately, this is a risk (albeit low) risk of any surgery.  The result after hematoma is variable and depends on many factors.  If you do not have a clotting problem, have not had bleeding issues with other procedures, and do not have easy bruising or bleeding, you should not be at an increased risk of further hematomas.  If you are uncomfortable with your surgeon's recommendations, it is perfectly acceptable to personally consult with another board-certified Plastic Surgeon.  A good surgeon welcomes second-opinions.  Ask your surgeon who he recommends.

Jarrod Little, MD
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Face/neck lift. Looked good at 3 weeks but I developed a hematoma. What do I do now? Do I need a revision specialist?

Yes I would be happy to evaluate you and offer surgical options. But you need to understand choosing DR surgery caused scar tissue thus the revision operations.. will be expensive. In the $12,000 ranges.. 

Need for revision after facelift

If this is 1 year post surgery I don't think anything will change from this time forward. A hematoma can occur in the hands of the most experienced surgeon and usually has little impact on the final result once it resolves. This sounds like a situation where the underlying muscle and fascia repair has failed. This can definitely be resolved with revision surgery and the prior history of hematoma is not a deterrent unless you are on certain medications that anti-coagulate. Be optimistic as a revision will probably work well. 

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Facelift problems

Hello and am sorry to hear about your problems.  Bleeding after facelifts is uncommon but can happen.  Usually, it does not affect the final result.  However, stretching of the skin can occur.  You deserve a consultation with a plastic surgeon.  Be sure to see one (or several) who are certified by the American Board of Facial or Plastic Surgery and have extensive experience with facial cosmetic surgery.  Good luck to you.

Robert J. Spies, MD
Paradise Valley Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 79 reviews

Revision Facelift surgery

You should have an in person consultation to really review your concerns and goals.
Revision facelift surgery can be performed.   A hematoma after facelift surgery is not uncommon.  Just because you had one does not mean you are more likely to have a hematoma with your secondary surgery.  A secondary procedure may not be as involved as your  first.  I find tissue glue helps reduce the risk of hematoma formation.

Philip Solomon, MD, FRCS
Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.2 out of 5 stars 78 reviews


You appeared to have relapse after the facelift.  This is not uncommon with less aggressive techniques or mini-lifts.  I suggest a facelift revision with SMAS technique for a long lasting result.  You should be able to get a nice natural result that lasts.  Best wishes!

Facelift Result

Sorry to hear about your difficulties.  Based on the information provided,it sounds as if you need to have an in person consultation to assess your current situation and to hear your concerns. I would recommend seeing a Board Certified Facial Plastic Surgeon who performs a lot of Facelifts.  As you know, Florida is heavily represented by patients at or beyond retirement age.  As such, about 50% of the Facelifts I perform in my practice are secondary or revision facelifts.  See a few surgeons, look at a lot of results, and go with your gut feeling.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 81 reviews

Recurrent sagging after face and neck lift with hematoma.

I am very sorry to hear of your difficulty.  It is not uncommon for hematoma to stretch the skin and result in the loose skin folds that you see in your neck.

I suggest that you visit the Smart Beauty Guide which is available online and will list plastic surgeons in your area.  To be included on this website the plastic surgeons have to be experts in aesthetic surgery as well as board certified.  A revision of your SMAS facelift with attention to in particular tightening the neck should help you if done by an expert surgeon.  Of course with your previous history of hematoma you will want to have drains, larger than usual, left in for probably 2 days.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.