Options for revision after breast implant and mastopexy fail and bottom out?

It has been three months post op and breast have bottomed out both vertically and laterally

Doctor Answers 3


Options include going with smaller implants that put less pressure on your tissues, revising the pocket inferiorly and laterally to support the new implants, and limit physical activity for 4 weeks after the revision.  Best wishes, Dr. T. 


Sorry to hear about your issues.  It might be a bit early to do a revision if the tissues are not soft. A revision may be offered by 4-6 months after the first surgery.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Revision Options

Now, considering the fact that the full healing process of augmentation and lift procedures can be three months you may be finishing up in healing. It would be good to visit your surgeon for a follow-up to make sure that the healing process is final before deciding upon a revision.

Revision of #breast implant and lift #cosmeticsurgery may be needed for: asymmetry, continued ptosis, implant malposition as well as all of the other reasons needed for breast implant revision surgery. At times the #mastopexy will need to be changed from a periareola to a lollipop lift to get a more powerful lift.

Any breast operation can also result in changes in sensation. Larger implants and more agressive lift methods may have more of a problem

I usually prefer to do surgery in one stage.  A number of plastic surgeons prefer two operations. The mastopexy followed by implant surgery.  These procedures are usually staged at 2-3 months minimum to allow for swelling and healing to be at a reasonable point. My revision rate for one stage is less than 15%. Two stages is not necessary for at least 85% of the patients when performed by and experienced Plastic Surgeon.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

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