Are my Peri-areola scars bad(too wide, thick)? 6 months post op. Did my PS do a bad job? (photos)

Had Ba 6 months ago via peri-areola. I feel they are too thick and wide as i see other patients with nice thin, skinny scars. My ps convinced me during my pre-op to get peri-areola incision insisting they are "spectacular" invisible, hair thin scars. Will they get better in a year or could a revision make them smaller? Dr said i need counseling because i was crazy and look great so I would appreciate honest answers from bipartisan doctors. Thank You!!!

Doctor Answers 5

Peri-areolar scars

It is difficult to tell what exactly is going on with your scars as the photo lighting is not great.  Your scars look slightly thicker than normal.  This can happen for a variety of reasons and typically there is no identifiable cause.  It may be able to be improved upon with laser and of course surgical scar revision is always an option.

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Periareolar scarring

it takes scars one to two years to fully mature. It is difficult to discern what your scars look like from your photos. There are great scar products on the market like Silagen which can aid in the appearance of your scars. 

Susan Kaweski, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Scarring is unpredictable

and your surgeon did not do a bad job.  Your photos are not of the best quality so its challenging to really determine how visible they are.  If you truly have widened or raised scars that everyone can see when they look at you, you can call your surgeon on his claim on what quality of scar you could anticipate, especially if it made you choose that approach because of what he said... just ask him if that is a spectacular result and if insistent, you can always get a second opinion from the many surgeons in your neighborhood.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Periareolar scars

A scar takes almost 18 months to fully mature - so you still have lots of time!
Scars start with an inflammatory process, which causes redness around the incision in the first few days.  Then, over the next 12 weeks (3 months) the body lays down collagen, which is the thick scar tissue that helps a wound to heal.  This is laid down in a very disorganised manner, causing scars to look thick, red, firm, and unsightly.  Scars typically look their absolute worst at about the 12 week mark for this reason.  After 12 weeks, the collagen starts to re-organise itself so that it is more normal and cross-linked.  This process happens for just over a year and during that time, scars tend to fade, become thinner, less ropy or firm, and generally improve.
Things that can help facilitate scar healing include massage, silicone sheets, and good sun protection.
A scar that is hidden at the periareolar region is usually considered a good scar because there is already a colour change at that location, so the eye doesn't immediately notice the scar.
I would speak to your physician about massage and silicone strips.  You still have time for the scar to settle. While you can always have scars revised, a revision never makes them shorter and you will always have a scar.  The goal of a revision is to improve the appearance of a scar that has not healed well.  You have both time and options before entertaining that approach. Good luck!

Kirsty Boyd, MD, FRCSC
Ottawa Plastic Surgeon

Periareolar scar

Hello Adriana and thanks for your posted photos even they don´t help so much. The expectation pics are surely a long term outcome, the healing process is finished and yours is not. It takes at least 12 months to see a close to final result scar, in the mean time there are some things you could do like massaging, silicon strips, etc. Your PS left a line but every person heals differently.Best wishes.

Hector Milla, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.