Update 2 Months post op; Would 600cc give me the cup size I asked for? (Photo)

2 months postop and I'm still measuring a 36C when I asked to go up to a D. I have 500cc HP Mentor Gel implants. Would 600cc give me the cup size I asked for and could I accommodate a 600cc implant. I go see my surgeon tomorrow for my 2 month checkup. I would just like some advice on this.

Doctor Answers 3

Seeking cup size

Allow yourself time to heal from the initial surgery. You and your surgeon can assess the results in 6 months and plan additional steps from there. Your surgeon understands the scope of the initial surgery and the specifics about you so he or she can guide you if 600cc is feasible for you. 

Implant size and cup size do not equate well, and cup size is an inexact measurement as it will vary greatly among bra companies and even within the same company.

The size of the implants is based on a combination of a patient's goals and objectives and her anatomy. In order to provide a natural looking augmentation, the surgeon needs to evaluate many factors including soft 
tissue coverage, skin laxity, chest wall width, breast imprint width, the shape of the breasts and relative level of constriction to ensure that the breast implants are appropriate for your body. 

West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

I would recommend you get 720cc Implant

You can get a revision if you would like to get a D cup instead of a C cup. However, increasing from 500cc implant to 600cc implant would not be able to lift your breast up. Thus, I would recommend you get a 720cc implant in order to achieve your D cup. However, to be more accurate, I would need to know your height, your band size and your bust size.

Tanongsak Panyawirunroj, MD
Thailand Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Update 2 Months post op; Would 600cc give me the cup size I asked for?

Thank you for the question and photo.  

Online consultants will not be able to provide you with specific enough advice to be truly helpful. Ultimately, careful communication of your goals (in my practice I prefer the use of goal pictures, direct examination/communication in front of a full-length mirror, and computer imaging) will be critical. 

Generally speaking, the best online advice I can give to ladies who are considering revisionary breast augmentation surgery ( regarding breast implant size/profile selection) is:

1. Concentrate on choosing your plastic surgeon carefully.  Concentrate on appropriate training, certification, and the ability of the plastic surgeon to achieve the results you are looking for. Ask to see lots of examples of his/her work.

2. Have a full discussion and communication regarding your desired goals  with your plastic surgeon. This communication will be critical in determining  breast implant size/type/profile will most likely help achieve your goals. 

In my practice, the use of photographs of “goal” pictures (and breasts that are too big or too small) is very helpful. For example, I have found that the use of words such as "D cup” or "too big on me" etc means different things to different people and therefore prove unhelpful.

 Also, as you know, cup size varies depending on him who makes the bra; therefore, discussing desired cup  size may also be inaccurate.  Again, the use of computer imaging has been very helpful during the communication process, in our practice.

3.  Once you feel you have communicated your goals clearly,  allow your plastic surgeon to use his/her years of experience/judgment to choose the breast implant size/profile that will best meet your goals.  Again, in my practice, this decision is usually made during surgery,  after the use of temporary intraoperative sizers.

I hope this (and the attached link, dedicated to revision breast  augmentation surgery concerns) helps. Best wishes.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.