Can a 44 yr old who has diabetes 10 different surgeries, and weight loss surgery still be able to safely get a tummy tuck?

I have had 5ceserean births, umbilical hernia repair,gall bladder removal,hysterectomy,planning weight loss surgery and 2more hernia repairs.Would it be too risky after loosing the weight to get a tummy tuck within 1year?

Doctor Answers 12

Diabetes, Surgical History and Tummy Tuck

Thank you for your question.  Without a physical exam and lengthy conversation about your medical health profile, it would be impossible to determine with any certainty your candidacy for a tummy tuck or abdominoplasty procedure.  Your individual surgeries and history of diabetes alone are generally not preclusionary or preventative of undergoing a tummy tuck, but it is important as a board certified plastic surgeon to take everything into consideration (medical history, surgical history, and physical exam) before making a decision as to the safety of an elective cosmetic surgical procedure for a specific patient.  


I would recommend scheduling an in person consultation appointment with a board certified plastic surgeon who is well-experienced in abdominoplasty procedures and in working with massive weight loss patients.  I would recommend waiting to undergo a tummy tuck, assuming that you are a candidate for one, until your weight has stabilized and after your medical doctor has determined that your health and diabetes are stable and well-controlled.  I hope you find this helpful and best of luck! 

Preparing for Surgery

Hello,


Thank you for your question. You will likely be advised by your Plastic Surgeon to reach your goal weight and stabilize there for a few months before planning an Abdominoplasty. Your general health should be stable. Your surgeon may want to communicate with your other care providers and ensure you are not assuming any unnecessary  risks.


All the best

Tummy tuck

Thanks for your question.

You would need to be evaluated prior to answering whether or not you are a candidate for an abdominoplasty.  Abdominal scars can limit the blood supply to the flap so several transverse scars are worrysome.  Medical conditions are cleared by an internest so that is not a major concern.  Blood supply to the umbilicus may be limited due to the umbilical hernia repair.  Consult with several board certified Plastic Surgeons to guage your options.

Best of luck.

Dr. T

Douglas Taranow, DO, FACOS
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Complex medical issues and tummy tuck

None of your issues alone precludes you from getting a tummy tuck. Combine those issues make your tummy tuck more difficult. Look for a board certified plastic surgeon that deals with abdominal wall reconstruction as well as tummy tucks. They would be the right patient to evaluate whether you are a good candidate for a tummy tuck.

Good luck and congratulations on your weight loss. 

Ryan Hoffman, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Tummy tuck

You would need to be evaluated to see what your best options would be. As long as you are medically cleared (we have an in office internist who clears all of our surgical patients), you should be able to undergo the appropriate procedure. If you have many scars, a traditional tummy tuck may be risky. A modification or perhaps liposuction with mini tuck, etc may achieve your goals more safely.

An exam and consultation with a plastic surgeon is recommended to discuss your options and expectations.

Weight loss and surgery

I think that you should lose the weight first, and then get evaluated for a possible procedure. If your hernias have been fixed, then that is a good thing.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Tummy tuck with other health issues

Disbetes, weight loss, and prior surgery are not necessarily reasons that a tummy tuck cannot be done, however they can make the procedure and postoperative recovery more complicated.  Ultimately, you will need to be evaluated by your primary care physician, and possibly some other specialists, before your plastic surgeon can determine if surgery is safe for you. In order to get a qualified, ethical, and expert opinion on your surgical options and expectations, always have an in-person consultation with a plastic surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

Best of luck,
Keith M. Blechman, MD
New York, NY

Diabetic tummy tuck

This is a question which should first be asked of your endocrinologist and internist, who would be required to clear you for surgery. The fact that you have had multiple procedures would make a tummy tuck more complex given the scarring.  Diabetics are at greater risk for wound complications and healing issues.  With all that said, it seems that the abdominoplasty is something down the road to be evaluated once you have had the medically necessary surgeries and lost weight. Good luck!

Anything is possible ---but

Each person is evaluated individually -- I would need to know your weight and height -- thus your BMI -- which should be below 30, and your general state of health. Prior to any surgery you would need to be medically cleared. So, you have prep work to do. But feel free to speak to. A plastic surgeon. 

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric surgery may be the best operation you have. It may reduce or eliminate your diabetes, which can make you a healthier patient for a tummy tuck or panniculectomy down the road. You should wait at least a year after your bariatric procedure and make sure your weight is stable before any plastic surgery. Hernias can often be repaired at the same time as a tummy tuck. Make sure you see a board certified plastic surgeon who treats a lot of massive weight loss patients. Good Luck!

Jeffrey Gusenoff, MD
Pittsburgh Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.