Is it normal that I'm able to smile properly only 2 weeks after rhinoplasty?

I know this sounds a bit stupid, but I'm concerned because I wasn't able to smile normally for two weeks after surgery, and then randomly it came back. From what I've read it's supposed to take several months. Is this a good or a bad thing? I also read somewhere that someone said the longer it takes for your smile to return the better, because in the future your tip won't droop as much. Is this true?

Doctor Answers 3

Smile after rhinoplasty

This a great question.

Everyone has a different recovery from rhinoplasty. It is important to remember that each surgery labelled "rhinoplasty" is by no means the same for each case.  In general, your smile may or may not be affected by surgery.  If your smile is altered, your smile returns in a few weeks to as long as a few months following rhinoplasty in the majority of cases. 

A change in smile depends on many factors including the work at the nasal base and the change in rotation of the nose as this may mildly lift the lip.  I do not believe an early return to smile predicts a loss of tip support.  Tip support really depends the maneuvers chosen and the underlying anatomy.

Happy your smile has returned. What a wonderful way to start the new year.


New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Smiling after rhinoplasty

Smiling ease may perhaps be due to the fact that your swelling has subsided. Best of luck with your results.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Rhinoplasty and Smiling

The swelling that occurs at the base of your nose is what is responsible for this change in the appearance of your smile. As the swelling resolves, your smile will come back, therefore it is absolutely fine that your smile has returned and will not effect your outcome. good luck!

Satyen Undavia, MD
Philadelphia Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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