I gave birth via cesarean surgery - tummy tuck/liposuction.

hi, my name is Bontle i gave birth on the 15th of July ths year, its my second child. I've been struggling to loose my access tummy even though i exercise. i am not sure on how a tummy tuck or liposuction works. i really dont mind paying i just need the fat off my body. I've never struggled with loosing any body fat until now with my second pregnancy. please help!

Doctor Answers 3

I gave birth via cesarean surgery - tummy tuck/liposuction.

I strongly recommend Not operating upon any of the above Plastic Aesthetic Operations until you are at least 6 to 12 months after your second (current) pregnancy. Besides this, I would recommend you having a BMI around 25, not being under any type of contraceptivos, have execrase and appropriate diet, not traveling more than 3 hours or more before the day of your surgery, and don´t drink nor smoke at the time of your operations. Ask your surgeon to stay overnight at the hospital, whatever the Liposculpture or Tummy-tuck would be. I concur with  the previous colleague in the most important Fact: Always consult with a Certified Plastic Surgeon.


Mexico Plastic Surgeon

I gave birth via cesarean surgery - tummy tuck/liposuction.

Thank you for the question.   


Generally, the tummy tuck operation involves removal of excess skin/adipose tissue of the lower abdominal wall and re approximation of the abdominal wall muscles that may have spread with pregnancies and/or weight gain/loss. Liposuctioning is often used as a tool during the procedure.


Generally speaking, the “ideal” patient for tummy tuck surgery is one who has completed pregnancies, is psycho socially/emotionally/financially stable, has an excellent social support system surrounding him/her, is capable of arranging enough recovery time, does not smoke and who has reached a long-term stable weight.


Liposuction surgery, on the other hand, refers to an operation that essentially suctions out adipose tissue. The operation does not involve any skin removal or re approximation of abdominal wall muscles. The best candidates for liposuction surgery of the abdominal wall are patients with good quality skin elasticity and a moderate degree of diet and exercise resistant adipose tissue superficial to the abdominal wall muscle layer. Patients who are significantly overweight, have significant abdominal wall laxity, and/or have lost a significant amount of skin elasticity are not generally good candidates.


My best suggestion: seek consultation with board-certified plastic surgeons who can demonstrate significant experience helping you achieve the type of outcome you will be pleased with. You may find the attached link, dedicated to tummy tuck surgery concerns, helpful to you as you learn more. Best wishes.

Liposuction/TT After C-section

It is very common after C-section for women to develop hanging skin or a pulled in scar that changes completely how the abdomen looks, and this is nearly impossible to correct through exercise.  Liposuction generally works well when the skin is in good condition but there is localized fat that will respond to contouring.  When the skin is already loose, tummy tuck or skin removal is really the only method of making the contour normal again.  Having said that, I recommend that moms wait at least 9-12 months after childbirth to pursue any significant body contouring surgery.  Things change so dramatically in that time, and even if we identify a problem that we know will not recover on its own, sometimes the extent of what is required will change based on postpartum recovery.  Focus on healthy diet and exercise and consult with a plastic surgeon to fully assess your needs and determine the appropriate timing for the improvement you desire. Be patient, enjoy the baby, and remember that it is important that you have adequate time to recover when you do pursue surgery so start lining up family and friends to help with those 2 kids! Best wishes.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.