I see a really small spider vein forming, what can I do?

I'm 28 years old and fair skinned. I see a really tiny spider vein forming on my thigh is there anything I can do so it doesn't get bigger?

Doctor Answers 6

Spider vein treatment

Thank you for your question!  Spider veins can be addressed by injecting a medication (sclerotherapy) into the vein that will cause it to disappear with time.  There is no downtime with this treatment and is a safe and effective treatment.  I would recommend an evaluation with a board certified plastic surgeon to determine the best treatment option for the spider vein cluster.  Best of luck to you!

Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Spider vein

Treatment for spider veins depends in part on size and color. If the area you are referring to is thin and red, it can be treated with a laser or sclerotherapy. If the area is larger, or more blue/purple in color, lasers don’t often work well for these. Sclerotherapy involves injecting a saline (salt water) solution or some other sclerosing agent into the blood vessel, which causes it to collapse.  Results are improved by the use of post-procedure compression garments.

Audrey Klenke, MD
Hilton Head Island Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Spider Vein Treatment on the Legs

Your best option depends on the size of the spider veins and the color.  Very small spider veins can be effectively treated by an experienced professional with the proper wavelength of laser.  If you go this route, make sure the person has lots of experience as a risk of such treatment is a laser burn.  If the vein is over 1mm or so in diameter, sclerotherapy administered by a board certified doctor is probably your best option.  There are a few different drugs used for sclerotherapy in the USA so ask which one they use and ask for referrals of patients who they've treated if want reassurance before your treatment.  Best of luck, Doc Halliday

Douglas Halliday, PhD, MD
Syracuse Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Thigh spider veins.

The best treatment for a singular thigh spider vein would be sclerotherapy, or if it is very small, topical laser treatment.

John Landi, MD
Naples General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Tiny spider vein

If it's just a tiny spider vein and it bothers you, it can likely be treated by sclerotherapy (or external laser, although the latter is usually not as good).  A single tiny spider vein is usually not worrisome, but does bother some patients cosmetically.  Spider veins tend to increase in number with age. The greatest risk factor is genetics. Other risk factors include hormonal stimulation, pregnancy and obesity.  Best advice - stay in shape and seek a vein specialist's opinion.

Preventing spider veins

Preventing spider veins  can be difficult because there has not been one thing in the medical literature to support the prevention of spider or varicose veins. However if you have a job that requires long periods of standing or sitting, compression stockings have been shown to be good for maintaining your healthy legs and potentially prolonging the appearance of additional spider or varicose veins.  Spider veins and varicose veins are mainly a genetic problem, however they can be exacerbated by pregnancy, long periods of standing, long periods of sitting, history of blood clot, and a multitude of other things.  Aside from compression stockings, you may want to consider surface laser to treat the spider vein sooner rather than later, or sclerotherapy, which is an injection to the spider vein that causes a chemical damage to occur to the vein resulting in disappearance of the vein.  I always try to encourage patients to take care of their concerns, cosmetic or not, sooner rather than later, otherwise it can be overwhelming to treat requiring several treatments versus a few.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.