Plastic Surgery and Returning to Work?

Hello there! I am a recent college grad who will be starting a new job soon in the city (media/publishing field). I have been wanting to get Voluma to have higher cheekbones instead of flat cheeks, but don't think I'll be able to do this before starting work. I am a bit nervous because I don't know if this will be received negatively at work. I imagine that there would be something noticably different in my appearance and wonder if having this procedure could somehow lead to termination. Maybe I'm being overly cautious?

Doctor Answers 5

Dermal Fillers Make You Look Better Not Different

Even if you have to wait until starting your job before getting your filler, the difference in your cheekbones doesn't have to be dramatic. Begin with just one syringe of Voluma per cheek, and then, if you still want more, it can be added later. One syringe of product is a 1/5 of a teaspoon so it would take a lot for you to look drastically different.  I agree with the other suggestion that changing your hair could deflect attention away from the added volume in your cheeks, but 2 syringes if injected properly should not even be perceivable by anyone but you.. Please consult a board-certified dermatologist and good luck on your new job!


San Diego Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Voluma

I would be surprised if an individual is terminated from a position for the use of soft tissue fillers. Unless you are working with very astute individuals or you plan to have a significant amount of Voluma injected, most co-workers will not recognize that you had injections performed. If you are worried, then have your hair cut at the same time. Co-workers are more likely to focus on your hair changing.

Plastic Surgery and Returning to Work

Thank you for your question, and congratulations on your first job out of college! This is a very exciting time for you, and its natural to want to make a good first impression.  Voluma placement is a minimally invasive procedure that can be performed in most plastic surgery offices in 30 minutes or less.  If you have an idea of the look that you are looking to achieve, and communicate these to a board certified plastic surgeon, it is possible to accentuate your look, and not cause a radical change in your appearance.  Recovery from Voluma is also very quick, with a lower risk of bruising than other fillers, and any swelling resolving within days of injection.  

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Voluma and job retention

Thank you for asking about Voluma.

  • Congratulations on your new degree and new job!
  • Many working people have fillers of all kinds and go back to work the same day.
  • Naturally you are nervous - because you haven't had it done before and aren't sure what to expect.
  • If you can't afford it before work - that is ok.
  • Many working people  - especially in media and publishing! - have fillers.
  • So when you have it done after you start your job, just have 1 syringe - and be sure to have a good cover-up make up in case there is bruising - usually there is none. .
  • You will be a little swollen - but if anyone comments, a good response is that you think you may have a new allergy.
Always consult a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Hope you find this information helpful. Best wishes.

Returning to work after Voluma

Not everyone needs the same amount of Voluma and it would be possible to gradually add volume to your cheeks without it looking very noticeable to someone else.  You could easily have one syringe used for both of your cheeks the first time and then wait a week or two to see if you would like more.  This way, the result would be more gradual then having it all placed at one time.  

Michael I. Echavez, MD
San Francisco Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.