What is the likelihood of being able to breast feed after you have BA? I have no kids, but plan to one day.

Doctor Answers 17

Incision Location Is Important

It's commendable that you are considering the future implications of having breast augmentation surgery. This is a very common question among women considering breast implants, and you should definitely inform your surgeon about your desire to have children someday, because that can influence his or her recommended incision location. An incision on the lower edge of the areola (the darker skin surrounding the nipple) poses more risk to breastfeeding than an incision made at the base of the breast (inframammary location) or at the underarm area (transaxillary incision). Good luck with your procedure.

Breastfeeding after surgery

Medical research indicates that breastfeeding is possible after breast augmentation, and I have had many patients who had no problem doing so. You should talk to your surgeon about your intention to breastfeed so they can plan your surgery accordingly. It is believed that a periareolar incision may increase the risk of breastfeeding difficulty, therefore an alternate incision may be used.

Breast feeding is certainly possible, but not everyone is able

A breast augmentation alone will not stop you from being able to breast feed, and it doesn't even really matter what incision was used.  However, I assume you have small breasts, so you may not have enough breast tissue to breast feed.  Having said that, even some women with large breast can't breast feed either.  If having kids is just something you hope to do someday and you want breasts now, go for it.  If you were actively planning a family right now, I'd tell you to wait.  Good luck!

Robert S. Houser, DO
Columbus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Breast feeding after augmentation

I love that you are thinking ahead and considering all possible future ramifications of having a breast augmentation.

The ability to breast feed is determined by many factors. But having a breast augmentation is not likely to be one of them.

Even though an areolar incision has the theoretic possibility of interrupting some mild ducts, I am unaware of any woman who has been unable to breast feed because of this factor alone.

One thing to think about is the small percentage of women who have decreased nipple sensation following augmentation.

Enjoy your augmentation before and after your kids!

Good luck!

Frederick K. Park, MD
Rocky Mount Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Breast feeding after augmentation

In general, most if not all breast tissue attachments to the nipple are preserved during breast augmentation, so if you were able to before surgery, you should be able to afterward.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Breasts feeding after breasts augmentation

Dear  steesta,
 This question comes often in my consultation for breasts augmentation. In my over 28 years of practice, I never had a complaint  from any of my patients about not being able to breasts feed. However. I always tell my patients that they , most likely, will have to supplement the breasts feeding will bottle feeding, since their natural small breasts will not satisfy  the hunger of the baby.
 Breasts augmentation surgery is very satisfying and powerful surgery. It is quite common that shortly after surgery my patients get married or get pregnant or both. This procedure is one of the best investment that you can have in yourself. It will increase , most likely, your confidence, self esteem and the joy of buying new cloths...
 Not all result are the same, because experience, skills and aesthetic eye, are critical for good and satisfying outcome.
   So, do your due diligence and choose wisely.
  Always, consult with experienced board certified plastic surgeons who operate in accredited surgery center for your safety. Most importantly, check the before and after pictures in the photo gallery, ro make sure that they are numerous, consistent and attractive.
                            Best of luck,
                                                      Dr Widder

What is the likelihood of being able to breast feed after you have BA? I have no kids, but plan to one day.

Thank you for your question.  
 
Implants placed using the fold incision should not have much, if any, impact to the breast tissue and the milk ducts that connect to the nipple.   I have had many patients go on to breast feed after an augmentation with that incision.    I do not use the nipple incision but that incision has more impact from scarring on the milk ducts.  




Breast Feeding and Surgery

Breast feeding after a breast augmentation is possible.  Prior to having the surgery you will need to consider the approach and were the incisions are made.  That being said, as physicians we have to say that we cannot guarantee nor predict your ability to breast feed, and that is after any kind of surgery on the breast.  Besides breast feeding, one can not predict now the breast may change after a pregnancy.  Many women who have had breast augmentation prior to having children do just fine.

Breast Feeding

Hello,

Many of my BA patients have gone on to breastfeed later in life with no issues. The incision under the breast and placement under the muscle is considered to be the least likely to cause risk to nipple function and it makes breast imaging easier. Some women are not able to breast feed regardless of implants. I recommend that you discuss these concerns with your Plastic Surgeon when planning.

All the best!

What is the likelihood of being able to breast feed after you have a BA? I have no kids, but plan to one day.

Thank you for your question. Typically the milk ducts are not disturbed during a breast augmentation surgery. Speak with your surgeon regarding surgical approach and how it will impact you. 

Best, 

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 427 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.