I am having trouble finding a Doctor who will perform a TT using local anesthesia. Are there any on here?

I found only one office in Dallas who does such surgery and I am really interested in finding any others throughout the World! I am willing to travel

Doctor Answers 13

Tummy Tuck under Local Anesthesia

As a surgeon who performs several tummy tucks each week under general anesthesia, I can tell you that it would be difficult to achieve the same level of muscle repair (plication) without relaxing the muscle first.  Muscle relaxation typically requires general anesthesia to protect your airway when the medication to provide muscle relaxation is given.  In addition, the extensive dissection to the level of the ribs would be difficult to achieve with local anesthesia alone.  It would simply be too painful plus the amount of local that would be required to make you comfortable could be toxic.  If there is any reason why anesthesia can not be performed in your case, this procedure might not be a good choice for you.

Tummy tuck under local

As someone who has seen multiple issues with travelling for surgery. I would recommend finding a local doctor to perform your surgery.A tummy tuck under local can be performed but there has to be a really good reason for avoiding anesthesia. The abdominal muscle repair that occurs with a standard tummy tuck may also have to be modified. Without pictures it is hard to tell if you would be a good candidate. I would be happy to see you to determine your eligibility for the surgery.

Ryan Hoffman, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Tummy Tuck under Local Anesthesia Alone, not safe

Hello and thank you for your question,The reason it is so rare to find a plastic surgeon who performs this procedure under local is because it is not the safest way to do it. I perform this procedure with TIVA, which stands for Total Intravenous Anesthesia) in my accredited operating room in my office. Using TIVA means that the patient does not have inhaled gas anesthetic which is characteristic of general anesthesia. The only medications you receive are through the IV. Your airway, however is secured as with traditional general anesthesia. The great thing about total intravenous anesthesia is you don't wake up groggy or nauseous as you do with general. It is incredibly safe.

TT under local

i disagree about using general anesthesia for this procedure. I have been doing TT in an approved office setting for over 25 years using IV sedation, dully monitored. It is very safe , and, not to rule out general, I think it brings more possible complications into it. Overall though, driving on the roads is far more dangerous than having an anesthesia by a board certified plastic surgeon.

Robert V. Mandraccia, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Tummy tuck

Hello and thank you for your question. It will not be possible to perform plication of your rectus muscles using local anesthesia.  This will not result in an optimal result in most patients.  General anesthesia is a much better option for this procedure and can be performed safely under the right conditions.  Make sure you specifically look at before and after pictures of real patients who have had this surgery performed by your surgeon and evaluate their results.  The most important aspect is to find a surgeon you are comfortable with. I recommend that you seek consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you in person.

Best wishes and good luck.

Richard G. Reish, M.D.
Harvard-trained plastic surgeon

Richard G. Reish, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 80 reviews

TT under local anesthesia?

There is only one situation that I can think of where a tt can be done with local anesthesia..and that is a small minitummytuck.  Someone with a very small "pooch" in the lower abdomen.  This patient is extremely rare to find.  Be careful.  I WOULD NOT recommend doing a full tummy tuck under straight local anesthesia.  You will NOT be happy with the outcome in my opinion.  If this was a very easy thing to do effectively...we ALL would be doing it and you would not have a hard time finding someone in the world.  That alone should tell you something.  I hope this helps.  Good luck.

Dr V

Bhupesh Vasisht, MD
Voorhees Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 77 reviews

Tummy Tuck with Local Anesthesia

I would not recommend a tummy tuck under local anesthesia. A true abdominoplasty is a major surgery and the risks of performing this type of procedure under local out way the potential rewards. Skin excisions and scar revisions can be done under local, but tummy tucks are best performed under general.

Sarah A. Mess, MD
Columbia Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Tummy tuck under local

Performing a tummy tuck solely under local I think would be too uncomfortable for the patient. While I understand that you might be nervous about anesthesia.  It is very safe and allows you to be completely relaxed during the procedure so that a good muscle plication and removal of excess skin can be performed.  I perform many of these in my office accredited OR. Best of luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Abdominoplasty under local anesthesia

Abdominoplasty necessitates general anesthesia. The muscle work cannot be accomplished under local. Furthermore, local anesthesia is not a benign thing when dealing with such a large area. Read up on lidocaine toxicity.  It is possible to do some abdominoplasties under spinal if your fear is going to sleep and not waking up.  To the extent that a group of qualified plastic surgeons will not offer the anesthesia you desire, that alone should be telling you something.

Tummy tuck

A traditional tummy tuck under only local? Bad idea. An exam and consultation with a plastic surgeon is recommended to discuss your options and expectations. This would include discussing anesthesia concerns.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.