I recently noticed swelling under my left implant (where my incision was). Should I be concerned? (Photo)

I got my surgery 9 days ago and even had a followup with my doctor the other day. She saw the difference and said it looked as if one of my stitches loosened or something and that that was the cause. Is this a health complication or is this swelling something that will go away on its own?

Doctor Answers 8

Swelling or double bubble

It acutally looks like a double bubble. On exam one can determine if this is fluid or the implant. If fluid will need treatment.  If double bubble, will likely need revision.


New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Breast fold asymmetry and breast augmentation

Hi,

Thanks for posting your question. I am happy to try and help you. It is important to remember that a board certified plastic surgeon will be your best resource when it comes to an accurate assessment of your situation, and concerns.

Having said that, you should go see your plastic surgeon. Online consultants are not the appropriate source of information for you; your plastic surgeon should be your resource when it comes to postoperative concerns.

Best wishes,

Dr. Michael J. Brown
Northern Virginia Plastic Surgeon

This is a double fold contour deformity

nk472,

Internal release of the tissues and pectoralis muscle support below the level of your original inframammary fold leads to this contour bulge that is termed double fold, and is part of the spectrum of bottoming-out. This sometimes occurs in situations where one fold was higher than the other pre-op and an effort is made to even out the folds by releasing support tissues.  It may look a little better after all the swelling is gone, but is not going to repair itself, and can lead to later worsening.  You can see that the upper pole volume is also greater on the right side, whereas some of the volume on the left is visible below the original fold level, where it has settled.  Ask your surgeon specifically what she believes is going on, as the entire width of the lower pole of the breast is not sutured at primary augmentation, and thus sutures "loosening" does not explain this.  Bottoming out can be repaired. I hope that this helps.  Information about bottoming-out cause and remedy is found at the link that follows.

Thomas M. DeWire Sr., MD (retired)
Richmond Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Breast Implant Recovery and Results

Thank you for your question about breast implants.

At 9 days, I can't say with certainty but you may be bottoming out or developing a double bubble.

For a question like this, I recommend you stay in contact with your board certified plastic surgeon and follow all instructions.

Best wishes.

J. Jason Wendel, MD, FACS
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 150 reviews

Bottomed out

Thank you for your question and photo.  It appears that you have bottomed out.  Please address this issue, which needs a revision, with your operating surgeon.

All the best,

Dr. Results
Miami, FL

Swelling under implant

While not a health complication or emergency condition, it needs close follow up to see if it will settle on it's own or not.  Follow your plastic surgeon's instructions during the healing process and discuss your options.

I recently noticed swelling under my left implant (where my incision was). Should I be concerned?

Concerned you might have bottomed out? Best to address this issue ASAP...............................

Double Bubble

It looks like you're developing a double bubble and is likely the implant below the native breast crease not swelling that your seeing. Based on her incision it looks like she may have attempted to lower the fold on that side. She would know best how much lower, if any, she intended the new crease, where the deep stitches are located and the type of inferior release performed. You will know if you did something excessive that may have "popped" her internal sutures. I would place you in a tight fitting supportive bra and watch how things settle out over the next few weeks, but it may take a pocket revision or capsulloraphy to tighten that pocket. Discuss this with your surgeon. Best of luck.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.