Is developing seromas normal after a tummy tuck?

Doctor Answers 9

Yes it is

Seromas may happen after tummy tucks and it is an expected complication.  Good news is that it can be taken care of by draining it.  Speak to you plastic surgeon and be patient.


Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Is developing seromas normal after a tummy tuck?

Thank you for the question. Yes seromas can occur occasionally after tummy tuck surgery. Usually aspiration of the fluid accumulation allows for resolution. There is no knowing exactly how many aspiration sessions will be necessary before the seroma does not recur. I hope this helps. 

Tummy Tuck Revision/Tummy Tuck/Abdominoplasty/Liposuction/High Definition Procedures

Thank you for your question.

Yes, seromas can occur with Tummy Tucks.  They are not dangerous and can be treated percutaneously.

The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.

Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative plastic surgery.

Dr. Schwartz

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

#RealSelf100Surgeon

#RealSelfCORESurgeon

Is developing seromas normal after a tummy tuck?

Thank you for your inquiry.  Seromas are one of the most common complications with a tummy tuck.  However, that being said, are not very common.   A seroma is a collection of fluid that can form as the abdominal wall heals.  It is not dangerous and can easily be drained by inserting a needle through the skin in the office.  This may take several visits until it resolves.  The procedure is painless as the skin on the lower abdominal wall has less sensation right after surgery.

I hope this helps.

Seromas

Unfortunately seromas can occur after tummy tuck surgery, and may require percutaneous draining if they don't resolve by themselves or are large/enlarging.

Anthony Barabas, MBBS
Cambridge Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Sseroma

Hello dear, thanks for your question.   A seroma after tummy tuck is not an infection or an error committed during the surgery. Sometimes, the fluid just accumulates and the body cannot drain it by itself. A seroma after tummy tuck is not an abscess too, however if left untreated, it could turn into one. Seromas are not also hematomas or pooling of blood. 

A seroma after tummy tuck occurs because of large tissue disruption. You could also acquire seromas through undergoing extensive surgeries or blunt accidents. 

A seroma after tummy tuck would not cause any alteration on how your body looks after the surgery. After treatment of the seroma, the desired outcome of the tummy tuck would still be achieved. 

I recommend to always be in total communication with your surgeon. 


Good luck :)

Tania Medina de Garcia, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 362 reviews

Seromas

Serums can happen but they are not that common. Treatment often requires serial puncture to aspirate the fluid.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Abdominoplasty/tummy surgery

Fluid collections, or seromas, may develop after tummy tuck surgery and frequently drains are used to prevent them.. if seromas do develop they can be treated with drainage procedures or placement of drains-

Seroma after tummytuck

Hello and thank you for your question. Seromas are a possible post operative complication you can experience after having a tummy tuck. They can be due to too much activity or not wearing your garment properly after surgery. It is not something that happens to everyone but something you should be aware of to watch out for as you are healing. If at anytime you feel that you are developing a seroma it is important you contact your surgeon right away to have it drained. Best of luck with your healing!

John W. Tyrone, MD
Gainesville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.