Does it look normal? (Photo)

I sometimes find that my labia gets irritated by swimming but I did have a past boyfriend who mentioned "your lips are so big".. which maybe is making me paranoid.

Doctor Answers 9

The problem with your labia is your ex-boyfriend. Now that you're no longer with him, your problem is gone.

Swimming can irritate labia of all shapes and sizes. Try jumping into some dry clothing as soon as you're done and your irritation should improve. There are many words to describe boyfriends who make foolish comments about their partners, but "past" is probably the best. Get on with your life, there's nothing wrong with you.

Labiaplasty

I would suggest a labiaplasty AND a new boyfriend.  You would be a good candidate for a labia minora but you should do it for yourself and NOT for anyone else.  Be sure to choose a Board certified plastic surgeon who specializes in labiaplasty and has an extensive photos gallery.

"Normal" vaginal appearance

There is a very wide spectrum of what a "normal" vagina looks like, and that normal spectrum is not always portrayed in the media, making many women self conscious of their own appearance. So please keep that in mind. However, if the appearance of your labia makes you uncomfortable or lack confidence, then you should absolutely consider a labiaplasty. I always tell my patients that any plastic surgery procedure is about helping them feel their best! If a labiaplasty is going to make you feel your best, then why not? Just make sure you undergo the procedure with a board certified plastic surgeon who has a lot of experience with labiaplasty procedures. Additionally, if your labia gets easily and continually irritated from things like swimming, then a labiaplasty can absolutely help reduce that irritation. 

Jimmy S. Firouz, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Does my Labia Look Normal?

Thank you for posting your photographs with your interesting question. Judging from your photographs your labia minora are normal, but are perhaps bigger than average. Woman's clothing style, yoga pants, grooming and the internet have highlighted the size of the labia minora. Today, many woman like smaller, more symmetrical and if possible removal of the hyper pigmented edges. If the size of your labia minora are still a concern, I recommend a consultation with an experienced Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who can examine you, answer all of your questions, discuss your goals and show you dozens of their before and after labiaplasty results. Only when you are completely comfortable, should you proceed. Best wishes, Dr. Richard Swift

Question re anatomy

I agree with the others.  Your anatomy is certainly within normal limits.  The average length of the labia minora is between 2-4cm.  Patients considering labial reduction commonly report discomfort with tight-fitting clothing, sexual activity, and exercise and feel self-conscious regarding the size of their labia.  If you have ongoing concerns, you could discuss with a board-certified surgeon in your region, however there is nothing abnormal about your appearance.Best, Stephanie Power MD, MSc, FRCSC

Labia enlargement

I reviewed your photos. Your labia minora are enlarged but are within normal limits. If you don't like the appearance, a labiaplasty can be done, but it must be performed by a surgeon with experience. One of the two most common techniques is the central wedge technique, which I invented in 1995 and published in the plastic surgery textbooks.  It is also known as the "V" or wedge technique. Gynecologists and most plastic surgeons perform a labioplasty very differently. They essentially trim the labia minora (inner vaginal lips) and leave a long suture line instead of the normal labial edge. Their technique is the same whether a scalpel or a laser is used. In contrast, the central wedge removes triangles of tissue and bring the normal edges together. Thus, the normal labial edges, normal color, and normal anatomy are preserved, but the darkest labial tissue is usually removed.  If you have extra tissue on your clitoral hood, it can be reduced it at the same time. No matter the technique, an inexperienced or unskilled surgeon can lead to a high rate of complications, chronic scar discomfort, labial deformities, and further surgery. Gary J. Alter, M.D.
Beverly Hills, CA - Manhattan, NY

Gary J. Alter, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Does it look normal?

Thank you for sharing your question and photograph and I am sorry that your boyfriend has made you paranoid.  There is a wide spectrum of "normal" in female genital anatomy  and your labia are well within these limits.  If you have difficulties with your labia then discuss this with your ob/gyn physician for possible treatments.  Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Normal

I think you look absolutely normal.  I don't think you need a labialplasty from the pics that you have provided. Do not be paranoid.   The labia minora are not so big as was described by your past boyfriend. He is wrong.  You look normal.   I would not worry...but I am sure that your GYN doc can confirm this. Good luck!

Andrew T. Cohen, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Are my Labia normal?

The simple answer is yes, you are normal.  That being said, if you are having irritation with swimming or intercourse, a visit with your gynecologist would be my first recommendation.  You do have some prominence to the labia minora or inner labia that may be causing this discomfort.  This is in no way abnormal, regardless of what a past boyfriend may have mentioned.  Labiaplasty is a very personal surgery and should only be considered if you are having a physical problem or if YOU feel that you don't like the appearance of your labia.

David F. Klein, MD
Concord Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.