1 week post op, upper blephoplssty healing asymmetric ? (photos)

I had upper blepho and I am at one week. My upper lids look so uneven will it ever be even? How bad does it look ?

Doctor Answers 15

Asymmetry following upper eyelid surgery

Definitely need more information and pre-op photos to understand your degree of early asymmetry.  At this point I would see your surgeon, review your problems and ask for suggestions.  If you had pre-existing ptosis that was not diagnosed prior to surgery this condition may need be repaired in the future.  


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Too early to tell

Yes, you are quite swollen on the left side.  At only one week out, it's too early to make an assessment.  Let the swelling settle down.  Eyelids generally take some time to settle in after surgery - really about 3 months or more before you see a "final" result.  Please speak with your surgeon about your concerns.

All the best,

Upper blepharoplasty

I think that more information is needed. It looks like one eye is ptotis. Did you have repair of one side?  

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Asymmetric swelling after blepharoplasty

What was the exact procedure you had performed? did you have a ptosis repair? Not knowing anything about the procedure performed makes it difficult to comment. I would recommend making sure you are not sleeping on the left side and visit your surgeon soon for evaluation.

Edwin Ishoo, MD
Cambridge Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Asymmetry of eyelids

The healing phase after surgery is always accompanied by postoperative edema and some degree of ecchymosis (swelling and bruising).  The edema may affect the eyelids to different degrees and consequently may create very obvious asymmetry (difference between the eyelids).  It is impossible at this early stage to make any determinations of postoperative outcomes.
Follow your surgeons' postoperative instructions to the letter and wait for the swelling to subside before judging the quality of the results.
Depending on the type of surgery performed (straight blepharoplasties with or without blepharoptosis repairs), slight postoperative asymmetries can be adjusted in the office.  This is best discussed with your Oculoplastic Surgeon.
Good luck with your recovery!

Daniel M. Calloway, MD
Jacksonville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 42 reviews

Asymmetry after Blepharoplasty

I fully appreciate your concern as there is a significant discrepancy in the level between your lids.  Your photos show quite a bit of edema and bruising which is not out of the ordinary at one week after surgery.  The left upper lid seems quite swollen, which is having the effect of pulling it down.  As the swelling resolves, I would expect a great deal of improvement.  So, it is just too early to make a judgement on final outcome.  Over the next couple of weeks, things will likely get better and hopefully put you at ease.  Best of luck.

1 week post op, upper blephoplssty healing asymmetric ?

Appears as lag opthalmus effect on left lid. Allow 30 days of healing than determine if still present. 

Post op Bleph , healing asymmetric....

Great question, this can sometimes occur and will even as the swelling goes down, as surgeons we occasional get more swelling than we would like and it certainly can cause some post op asymmetry.....discuss with your surgeon and continue to follow his advice....

Jonathan Weiler, MD
Baton Rouge Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 70 reviews

Assymetry at 1 Week

The photos are suggestive that you had a ptosis repair performed at the same time as your upper lid blepharoplasty.  This factor and the timing of your postoperative photo will lead most of us to the same conclusion: it is too early to make any judgments. Best to seek reassurance from the Surgeon you chose.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

Asymmetric swelling

While it is very early you are also very swollen, and more so on the one side than the other. While very concerning it is difficult to tell what is happening in a static photo. Consult directly with your surgeon so they can directly examine you and address your concerns.

Asaf Yalif, MD
Roswell Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.