Can I get implants out while continuing to breastfeed?

I am almost 31 and have had breast implants for almost 7 yrs and I am currently breast feeding my almost 10 month old. I want to continue to feed him past the one year mark but want my implants out now. I have read a few articles of women who have had the surgery while breastfeeding and everything went well. I have 350CC under the muscle.

Doctor Answers 6

Removal

It would be better for you to wait until about 3 months after breast feeding so you have no difficulty with feeding and have fewer risks with healing.


San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Breast implants - remove while breast feeding?

Thank you for asking about your breast implant removal.
  • Yes, you can have your implants out now if necessary.
  • You will need to pump and dump the milk during the time of surgery.
  • You are more likely to have bleeding, infection and to have milk drainage into the incision if it is done now.
  • If there is no compelling reason to do it now, it is best to wait until 3 months after you stop breast feeding. 
Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Best wishes - Elizabeth Morgan MD PHD FACS

Can I get implants out while continuing to breastfeed?

Thank you for your question.  The safest and most conservative course of action would be to complete your anticipated breast feeding with your 10month old and then seek implant removal as this would help minimize the risk of possible complications arising from milk production and surgery that could potentially alter this as well as allow your breasts to return to their new normal after nursing.  This allows for a better decision on what the best course of treatment for implant removal would be - implant removal alone or possible lift.  Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Implant removal

I would definitely recommend you wait to do electively remove your implants until after you finish breast feeding.  This is because, in some cases of surgery during breast feeding, milk production can be interrupted, or worse, cause leakage of milk into the wound or implant pocket resulting in healing complications.  You may also atrophy after breast feeding and require a mastopexy.

Jeffrey D. Wagner, MD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Yes you could but "why would you want to"?

I think that it will be in your best interests to have the breast implants removed once you have completely stopped breast-feeding. Otherwise, you expose yourself to complications such as fluid/milk accumulation postoperatively. Furthermore, once you have stopped breast-feeding and reach a long-term stable weight, you will be better able to evaluate the long-term “status” of your breasts and make good decisions regarding the best breast operation to achieve your long-term goals. Best wishes.

Breast Implant Removal and Breast Feeding

Successful Plastic Surgery depends on balance, stability and risk/benefit analysis. 
You do not state WHY you want yiur implants removed but you do say that you want to breast feed your infant for at least an additional 6 months. 
Removal of the implants will involve cutting across some of the milk ducts which may result in infection and breast tenderness as well as inability to continue breast feeding. Another factor to be considered is what would your breasts look like without the implants. They will look fuller while you are breast feeding than they would after your breasts return to their normal state. You may have seriously saggy breasts after explanation. Would be happy with that look or would you seek a lift at that time?
For this reason, it is best to delay your explantantation after you stopped breast feeding and your breasts have settled down. At that time implant removal may be done with or without a Breast Lift. 

Dr. Peter A. Aldea 

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 102 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.