Is it possible to achieve good results without a lift? Possible tubular breasts. (Photo)

I am 25 and I have had tubular breasts since I was a teenager. After nursing a child my nipples are no longer puffy like they used to be but I have very little upper breast tissue and I hate how far apart they are. I have a consult at the end of June but I'm wondering if by pictures it can be seen whether or not I will absolutely need a lift. Thank you!

Doctor Answers 17

Good Results Without a Lift?

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You don't truly have a tubular breast at this time, although your may have had a more of tubular appearance before having a child. However you do have a number of issues that would simply not be addressed by just putting in an implant. Your breasts are ptotic or sagging with the nipple and breast tissue resting below the breast fold. You also have an enlarged areola and wide space between your breast and very lateral positioned nipple. None of these problems will be corrected with just an implant. An implant can improve your overall breast shape and increase the size of your breast. Implants do not lift you breast. They can provide some fullness in the upper breast and rotate your nipple position upwards a bit which creates the illusion of a lift, but there is no actual lifting. Some surgeons might suggest that you can "get away" with just an implant but the result would be a larger breast that sits low on your chest wall without improved fullness in the upper breast, an areola that will stretch even larger, and a nipple that still is rotated downwards. I doubt that is the kind of result that you are looking for.

Alternatively, a lift will raise the position of your nipple and breast tissue, reduce the size of your areola, and depending upon how the lift is performed, it can also reposition your nipple and breast tissue closer to the center of your chest and narrow the wide space between your breasts. Doing that type of extensive lift will usually not allow for an implant to be placed at the same time. Obviously, it would be nice to get it all done in one surgery, but there are too many risks of complications and poor outcomes when attempting to do both at the same time. Understandably most patients want to avoid the extra scars and costs associated with a lift, but you will not be able to achieve an aesthetic breast shape and correct all of your concerns without one.

Is it possible to achieve good results without a lift? Possible tubular breasts.

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Thanks for the photos.  If possible, I would delay any breast surgery until you are done with childbearing. 

That being said, based on your photos, I do not see any way to a nice result without a full breast lift.  You and your surgeon may be tempted to do just a lift around the areola (Benelli) and an implant, but I think that would be a mistake.  It is almost always a mistake to compromise shape by limiting the length and position of scars. 

Also, you may not "need" an implant.  Just a lift will make your breasts look nicer and you may be a candidate for some fat transfer which would give your volume a little boost.

Make sure you see a surgeon who has a lot of experience in all aspects of cosmetic breast surgery.  He/she can discuss your options.

Lisa Lynn Sowder, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 77 reviews

Breast Augmentation with Lift

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Thank you for your question.

With the photos provided, it seems you would benefit from both breast augmentation and breast lift.

Your implant will be placed under the muscle.  The type, size, and shape of implants needs o be discussed in detail during the consultation as you have many options.

The type of lift does not require a vertical or "anchor shape" scar pattern on your breast.

The lift will mostly serve to shape the breast and areola and also adjust the relative size of the areola.

This can be done in a single stage or two stages.

I recommend a thorough consultation with a plastic surgeon who is not only BOARD CERTIFIED, but also has extensive experience in this type of combined breast surgery.

All the best,

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Whether or not you need a lift

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depends a lot on the position of your breasts on your chest and how perky you have to be to be happy.  You are what is considered the gray zone in my practice where many have augments alone and end up being very happy.  You can discuss the need for a lift with your chosen surgeon but in the end, it should be your decision.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Ptosis More Than Tubular

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Hello, 

Your breasts would not look satisfactory without the addition of a lift to the augmentation. No matter how larger, high profile, or over the muscle, implants will not rotate your nipple areolar complex to a pleasing position, and you will feel saggy.

Augmentation mastopexy is a complex surgery that should only be performed by ABPS certified/ASAPS member surgeons that specialize in all forms of cosmetic breast surgery. If you consult with a surgeon that only performs implants, you might be told that you don't need a lift, which is incorrect.

Best of luck!

Gerald Minniti, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 100 reviews

Lift or not.

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Hi GardenAnne, After looking at your fotos I think you definitely need a lift.  The type will depend on what the surgeon feels will give you the best result.. You only need an implant if you want to be larger or if you want firmer breasts with more upper pole fullness.  There is definitely a big difference in the post op appearance with a lift alone or a lift with implants. Do Not put a big implant in to fill the breast and avoid a lift because it will give you a big breast that hangs down lower.  Hope this helps.

William H. Sabbagh, MD
Detroit Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Is it possible to achieve good results without a lift? Possible tubular breasts.

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Thank you for your pictures and questions. After looking at your pictures, I do not think you have a true tuberous breast deformity. That being said, your need for a lift depends entirely on your goals. If your goal is only to fill up the breast with more volume without changing the look of the breast or the position of the nipple, then an implant may be all that is needed. If, however, you want to change the position of the nipple along with increasing volume, then a lift would be needed as well. I think that to obtain an optimal result, you would be best served by a lift and an implant.

Hope this helps!

Breast lift is appropriate

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Your photos show the need for a lift along with implants. You have too much droop to get a "good" result without one.

Is it possible to achieve good results without a lift? Possible tubular breasts.

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I am happy to say that you do not have tubular breasts.  You do however have mammary ptosis or sagging of the nipple below the inframammary crease.  A combination breast lift with implants may well be your best option.  Please see an experienced board certified plastic surgeon for an opinion.  For more information please read below:

Lift needed

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You have significant skin laxity that would best be corrected with a breast lift and Submuscular implants. Seek board certified plastic surgeon in your area

Stuart A. Linder, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.