Is it ideal for a patient with type 2 diabetes controlled to get a Tummy tuck/ BBL? (photos)

I have type 2 diabetes, just got my hemoglobin A1C and it was 6.3% as of 6.16.16 would love to get a nice shape to my body. What are the additional risk I will have?

Doctor Answers 8

Can Type 2 Diabetic Patient Get Tummy Tuck Surgery?

Tummy Tuck and/or BBL surgery is a possibility if your diabetes is under control. I see a fair amount of this in my Surgery Center. What IS important is that you and your surgeon work closely at obtaining good lab work which will show how controlled your medical condition is, and what possible steps can be taken to improve it prior to your surgery. Knowing risks ahead of time don't necessarily preclude you from having surgery, but disclosing medical conditions to your doctor will certainly improve the odds that you will have a safe surgery and better enjoy the results. Good for you for disclosing your condition and wanting to be sure that surgery will be safe for you. I hope many other patients read this and learn the importance of being truthful with your doctor.


San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 65 reviews

Multiple procedures, some advices:

Thank you very much for sharing your concerns with us.
For safety reasons, to be a good candidate for those procedures you want at the same time, your labs and cardiovascular preoperative evaluation must be optimal.
Therefore, you must be a healthy person, within an appropriate BMI and no history of diseases that increase the surgical / anesthetic risk degree.
Finally, I recommend you a skilled certified plastic surgeon in body contouring surgery and experienced in cases like yours where the planned operating time is less than five hours.
Respectfully,
Dr. Emmanuel Mallol Cotes.-

Emmanuel Mallol Cotes, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 178 reviews

Is it ideal for a patient with type 2 diabetes controlled to get a Tummy tuck/ BBL?

Type 2 Diabetes is less of a risk than Type 1 Diabetes. Based on your information, you can consider surgery but it your doctors will need to evaluate you. 

See link below for examples. 

Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 65 reviews

It is safe for you to have tummy tuck

Your numbers reflect controlled diabetes. Thus it will be safe to have tummy tuck and liposuction. Find a surgeon now.

Vasdev Rai, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Is it ideal for a patient with type 2 diabetes controlled to get a Tummy tuck/ BBL

The risks with diabetes and surgery is greater chance of infections. As to whether having your diabetes controlled ideal prior to surgery, I would be much more exacting. I will not operate on a patient for an elective procedure if their diabetes is not controlled. I do not think taking the chance of infection is a smart decision for something that can be postponed until proper diabetes control is achieved.

Julio Garcia, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Is it ideal for a patient with type 2 diabetes controlled to get a Tummy tuck/ BBL?

Diabetics who are under good glucose control and who have no other complications from their diabetes like peripheral vascular disease, heart disease, or kidney failure usually do very well undergoing a tummy tuck. Some physicians say that there is a slightly higher risk of infection, but I have not seen this in my practice.
Good luck

Is it ideal for a patient with type 2 diabetes controlled to get a Tummy tuck/ BBL?

While it is true that patients with Diabetes have a higher risk of wound complications, those patients that take good care of themselves and have an A1c that is acceptable generally do very well with the surgery. 

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Is it ideal for a patient with type 2 diabetes controlled to get a Tummy tuck/ BBL?

Thank you for the question. Well controlled diabetes is not a contraindication to tummy tuck surgery and/or other elective plastic surgical procedures. There are certain risks, such as infection, that will be greater for you compared to patients who do not have diabetes.

Always best to check with your primary care physician or endocrinologist for “medical clearance” prior to surgery. Managing your diabetic medications around the time of surgery (to avoid hypo as well as hyperglycemia), while you will have altered oral intake, will be important. I hope this, and the attached link, helps.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.