Severe tubular breast corrected by implants, what is the likelihood I will be able to breastfeed? (Photos)

I had silicone implants 4 years ago, incision under the areola. I'm just wondering if anyone here knows the statistics on whether women with my condition have been able to breast feed later in life. I haven't been able to find much info online.

Doctor Answers 3

Chances of breast feeding after augmentation in tubeous breasts???

It depends on a lot of issues... and  first and foremost is your own glandular tissue present.  If there is adequate tissue to respond to the hormonal changes during pregnancy, you should be able to breast feed.  Then define breast feeding as simply that ability for your infant to suckle?  Or to get total nourishment from breast feeding?  If you had an incision through the nipple, your changes of fully breast feeding are diminished.  If a lot of cutting was done inside to release your tissue, again, less chances to fully breast feed.  The implant itself is of no consequence to breast feeding.  It really depends on what was cut and what tissue you started out with.  From where you started, you have an awesome result and rather than focus on the ability to breast feed, simply enjoy them and be prepared to use formula should you have children.

Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Will I be able to breastfeed?

Thank you for your question and photos.  You have a very nice result.  To get this type of result in a tubular breast, typically a lot of internal tissue release is done.  This has the potential to injure nerves.  Additionally, the stretch of the implant can cause nerve injury.  Bottom line, there are no real statistics that anyone will be able to quote you.  As with many women in this situation, best advice is to give it a try and see.  Best wishes.  

Brian C. Reuben, MD
Salt Lake City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Severe tubular breast corrected by implants, what is the likelihood I will be able to breastfeed?

Thank you for the question. You are correct in that you will not be able to find much specific information when it comes to ability to breast-feed after breast augmentation surgery for patients who started out with constricted/tuberous breasts. As you may know, even patients who do not undergo breast surgery may have a difficult time breast-feeding with  constricted/tuberous breasts.   Much will depend, of course, on exactly what was done during your procedure (how much breast tissue and/or lactiferous ducts were divided).

 This may be one of those situations where only time will tell. Best wishes.

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