What is the risk percentage of death from lipo in 2015 on a mostly healthy 19 year old, by a board certified plastic surgeon?

Interviewed doctors,I have my mind made up mostly that I want this,left all other options behind,only thing holding me back is the chance of death.How likely is it? Is it 1/1000 or what does the fraction actually look like? Please and thank you.I want to get this done fairly soon.

Doctor Answers 14

Liposuction deaths

 Thank you for your question.  Liposuction on a healthy individual performed by a board-certified plastic surgeon, in a certified surgical center is very safe.  The risk of death is significantly lower than 1/1000. My advice is to find a board-certified plastic surgeon who performs liposuction  at a state accredited surgical center or hospital. Make sure he/she surgeon has staff privileges  at a local hospital.  I also recommend that your anesthesia be performed by a board certified anesthesiologist. Best of luck with your surgery. 


Allentown Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

What is the risk percentage of death from lipo in 2015 on a mostly healthy 19 year old, by a board certified plastic surgeon?

Thank you for the thoughtful question. You are very wise about being concerned about the safety of liposuction surgery.  The risk of death associated with the procedure is much less than 1:1000  but there are some variables that you can control that will significantly improve the safety factor.

Your best bet: choose your plastic surgeon very carefully.  I would suggest that he/she be a board-certified plastic surgeon who can demonstrate a significant safety history of achieving the types of outcomes you will be pleased with. Everything else including good judgment/advice/planning, anesthesia provider and safe surgery facility will follow. Best wishes.

What is the risk percentage of death from lipo in 2015 on a mostly healthy 19 year old, by a board certified plastic surgeon?

Thank you for your question, and I can understand your concerns.  The risk of liposuction in someone who is 19yo and otherwise healthy is much less than 1/1000.  Probably closer to 1/100,000.  I do remember a paper that showed death from liposuction was much lower than death from car accidents.  

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Liposuction

Surgery does carry risks but you can limit the risk by following several time tested rules.  Choose a board certified plastic surgery.  You procedure should be done is a fully accredited facility with access to a hospital if necessary.  You surgeons should have hospital privileges.  Use a Board Certifed Anesthesiologist.  Limit the amount of liposuction to less than 5 liters.  Use DVT prophylaxis.  Limit the amount of lipocaine used in the tumescent solution and follow establised guidelines for tumescent lidocaine.  These steps will avoid the most common complications from liposuction:
fluid, electrolyte, and blood shifts
DVT risk
lidocaine toxicity

John Burns, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Liposuction risks

Thank you for your question. Certainly, because liposuction is a surgical procedure, risks accompany it. Death is one of those risks. However, data indicate around 3 per 100,000 cases maybe the number answering your question. I would imagine that if there is a death following liposuction, it is a very unusual case where the patient was likely not healthy enough to have the procedure (not a good candidate), or the liposuction was combined with other procedures. When performed under local anesthesia, liposuction is likely to be even safer than that number. It's best to speak w/ a trusted plastic surgeon near you. Best wishes.

Paul J. Leahy, MD
Leawood Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Liposuction

Liposuction is very safe the number you quote is too high.  In a young healthy person the risk is extremely, extremely low.  I even perform liposuction under local, the patients are awake.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

What is the risk percentage of death from lipo in 2015 on a mostly healthy 19 year old, by a board certified plastic surgeon?

Greetings 

Thank you for your question. safety is number one both for patients and the surgeon. The risk of death associated with the procedure is much less than 1:1000 but there are some variables that you can control that will significantly improve the safety factor.
 

Bulent Cihantimur, MD
Turkey Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 79 reviews

Avoiding general anesthesia for liposuction is the best way to assure safety and best results.

General anesthesia has so much higher complications and risks than tumescent liposuction alone. Under local you can stand up and help the doc get the best results to fine tune the areas.

David Hansen, MD
Beverly Hills Dermatologic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Liposuction deaths

Thank you for asking about your liposuction.

  • Catastrophic deaths can occur with any surgery - because of rare genetic disorders, such as malignant hyperthermia. 
  • However a German study of liposuction deaths found no deaths when patients were cared for by a qualified plastic surgeon.
  • This has been my experience, based on legal review of cases of liposuction deaths.
  • If you are having liposuction of 5 L or less, in an accredited out-patient surgery center and done by an experienced Board Certified Plastic Surgeon, your risk of death will be very very small and much less than 1/1000.
Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Hope you find this information helpful. Best wishes.

Hi Definition Body Shaping -- Get VASER HI DEF with Fat Transfer

The risk of death is VERY minimal in young healthy patients.  I suggest you only go to an expert in body shaping, someone who is used to doing younger patients and those who need both fat reduction and body shaping.  Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 165 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.