Second surgery to go bigger, how much bigger should I go to achieve desired results?

In April I had a breast augmentation and went with 330cc, round moderate, silicone, mentor implants. At the time I couldn't go any bigger, my surgeon said 330cc was my limit. I still don't feel confident without a padded bra/bikini. How much bigger do I need to go to add further fullness to my breasts? I'm told 120 should be a cup size up I'm an AUS size 6/8 162cm tall and weigh 52kilos. I'm worried that 450 will be too big on my frame? but understand going to 400 may not be enough?

Doctor Answers 2

Implant size

The best way to pick implant size is based on your breast and chest width and not the volume. As the implants get bigger, they get wider. When the width of the implant fits the width of your chest, it will look nice and fit your frame. If the implants are too small, you will have a gap between them and they may look too far apart. If they are too wide, they will make you look top heavy as they may be too wide and stick well out past the sides of your chest. There are ways to get a bigger or smaller look.This can be done by picking a different implant profile. The higher the profile, the narrower the base width of the implant. If someone has a very narrow chest and wants to be big, they should consider a higher profile implant. If someone has a broad chest and they do not want to be too big but want to avoid the gap and still have cleavage without projection, they should consider a lower profile implant such as a moderate. There are options in between these such as the moderate plus. I prefer the underarm approach so there is no scar on your breast. The new silicone is the only way to go as far a rippling as the new silicone ripples much less than saline, especially in the larger implants.
Dr Scott Ennis

Second surgery to go bigger, how much bigger should I go to achieve desired results?

Thank you for the question.   You will find that online consultants will not be able to provide you with specific advice in regards to selection of specific breast implant size/profile. Ultimately, careful physical examination, measurements, and communication of your goals will be critical.

Generally speaking, the best online advice I can give to ladies who are considering revisionary breast augmentation surgery (regarding breast implant size/profile selection) is:

1. Concentrate on choosing your plastic surgeon carefully. Concentrate on appropriate training, certification, and the ability of the plastic surgeon to achieve the results you are looking for. Ask to see lots of examples of his/her work.

2. Have a full discussion and communication regarding your desired goals with your plastic surgeon. This communication will be critical in determining breast implant size/type/profile will most likely help achieve your goals.  In my practice, the use of photographs of “goal” pictures (and breasts that are too big or too small) is very helpful. I have found that the use of words such as “too big on my frame” or "C or D cup” etc means different things to different people and therefore prove unhelpful. Also, as you know, cup size varies depending on who makes the bra; therefore, discussing desired cup size may also be inaccurate. 

3. Once you feel you have communicated your goals clearly, allow your plastic surgeon to use his/her years of experience/judgment to choose the breast implant size/profile that will best meet your goals. Again, in my practice, this decision is usually made during surgery ( after the use of temporary intraoperative sizers). Viewing the patient's chest wall in the upright and supine positions, with temporary sizes in place, help select the best breast implant size/profile for the specific patient. I hope this, and the attached link (dedicated to revisionary breast augmentation surgery concerns), helps. Best wishes.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.