Submuscular or subglandular? (Photos)

What would be the best method in my case? I would like the implants placed under the muscle because I´m scared of them beeing too visible under my skin, but my surgeon said that I might need them placed over because of to much loose breast tissue? I´m getting 300/335 cc Mentor anatomical silicone implants (forgot to discuss profile). My stats: 105 lbs, 5,1". currently a 34A. Thank you!

Doctor Answers 4

Above or below the muscle?

Thanks so much for this question. Both methods are safe and effective, but they have pros and cons you need to consider and discuss with your plastic surgeon. For instance, above the muscle is a quicker recovery, but there may be a higher chance of ripples. With below the muscle, there's more pain during recover, but less rippling. I suggest you discuss this once again with your plastic surgeon. Best wishes, Dr. ALDO


Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 192 reviews

Submuscular or subglandular?

Thank you for your question.  Based on your photo your nipple appears to be above the crease beneath your breast therefore you should be able to have submuscular breast implants  without a lift.

There are so many advantages to having the implant beneath the chest muscle and especially with minimal breast tissue I would discourage you from having implants placed on top of the muscle.

In your situation a dual plane breast augmentation with implant under the muscle in my opinion is your best option.

Breast Implants/Breast Augmentation/Anatomic Gummy Bear Implants/ Silicone Implants/Breast Implant Revision Surgery

I appreciate your question.

It depends on your chest wall measurements and existing breast tissue as implant size does not accurately correlate to a bra size.  It also depends on the brand and style of bra you wear as size varies from manufacturer to manufacturer.

The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.

Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative breast surgery.

Best of luck!

Dr. Schwartz

Submuscular or subglandular?

Thank you for the question. Based on your photographs, I think that you are starting at a good place and should have a very nice outcome with breast augmentation surgery. Ultimately, careful communication of your goals (in my practice I prefer the use of goal pictures, direct examination/communication in front of a full-length mirror, in bra sizers, and computer imaging) as well as careful measurements (dimensional planning) will be critical.



There are pros and cons to the placement of breast implants in the “sub muscular” position versus the "sub glandular position”.    I will try to outline some of the differences here;  you may find the attached link helpful as well. 



I think it is in the best interests of most patients seeking breast augmentation surgery to have implants placed in the “dual plane” or sub muscular position.  This positioning allows for more complete coverage of the breast implants leading to generally more natural feel/look  of the implants in the long-term. This position will also decrease the potential for rippling and/or palpability  of the implants (which may increase with time, weight loss, and/or post-pregnancy changes). The submuscular positioning  also tends to interfere with mammography less so than breast implants in the sub glandular position. The incidence of breast implant encapsulation (capsular  contraction)  is also decreased with implants placed in the sub muscular position. 


On the other hand,  sub glandular breast implant positioning does not have the potential downside of “animation deformity” ( movement/ distortion of the breast implants  seen with flexion of the  pectoralis major muscle)  that can be seen with breast implants placed in these sub muscular position.    Best wishes with your upcoming surgery.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.