Stitches falling out after vaginal tightening surgery?

It`s now 12 days after vagina tightening surgery. i realised that the stitches are falling out when i clean. now 2 stitches fell out. Is this normal ? Or do i need it stitched again?

Doctor Answers 7

Stitches falling out after vaginal tightening surgery?

It is not uncommon to have occasional sutures fall off early in the healing process.  More then likely the sutures that have fallen are coming from the superficial layer of your surgical procedure.  However, I would make sure that your surgeon is aware and has examined you.  

Best of luck.

12 days after vaginoplasty sutures falling out

As after any type of vaginal surgery, it may occur that some of the most superficial stitches (sutures) become loose and come out. Most of the sutures utilized for closure of superficial layers start losing their strength about 2 weeks after surgery. Additionally, frequently at above the same time ( 2 weeks)  following a vaginal surgery many women feel more comfortable and start more intense physical activity, which may contribute to what happened in your situation. Usually, it should not affect the final surgical outcome but it would be prudent to be evaluated by the surgeon who performed the procedure. Once complete healing takes place, a revision can be performed if necessary.

Best regards.

Yvonne Wolny, MD

Vaginoplasty/Vaginal Rejuvenation

I appreciate your question.

Since there has been a change in your post op course, please contact your surgeon so he/she can examine you and recommend the most appropriate treatment plan at this time.

The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.

Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative plastic surgery.

Best of luck!

Dr. Schwartz

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

#RealSelf100Surgeon

#RealSelfCORESurgeon

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Sutures coming out after vaginal repair

When a typical vaginal repair or perineoplasty is done with sutures (stitches), patients may notice stitch material when they start to dissolve. This can be as soon as 1-2 weeks after surgery depending on the type and material used. We often use small and rapidly dissolving sutures purposely in certain sensitive areas on the surface. These may be seen in the bathroom, on pads, dressings, clothing or while bathing. If there is unusual pain, bleeding or concern about the appearance of healing wounds or tissues, then have your surgeon check the surgery site.

Stitches falling out after vaginal tightening surgery?

Thank you for sharing your question. Depending on the type of suture material used you may have some stitches that break and fall out.  If your surgeon used longer-lasting material in the deeper layers of your vaginal tissues your results should still be intact.  Voice your concerns to your surgeon, they can best provide you with reassurance. 

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Are your vaginal tightening stitches falling out?

Vaginal tightening surgery (vaginoplasty, vaginal rejuvenation, perineoplasty) are usually done with multiple stitches placed in multiple layers. The real work is done by the deep muscle stitches and these are not visible and do not fall out. The skin level stitches are the least important and if a few of these fall out nothing will happen to the quality of your results. I can only speak for my techniques, but many surgeons use a similar approach. Restitching is worthless and accomplishes nothing as these will fall out too.

2 weeks post op vaginal rejuvenation

thanks for sharing.  Though most sutures don't fall out for a few weeks I have had patients with suture fall out with in the first 12 days also.  There is nothing you can or should do about it at this time.  Replacing sutures at this point will not make a difference.  Most likely your healing process will continue without complications.

John R Miklos MD

Atlanta  ~ Beverly Hills ~ Dubai

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.