Is periareolar mastopexy really necessary for tuberous breast correction? (Photos)

Though I get that the standard procedure is thru inframamary to release lower pole, I'd REALLY prefer to avoid mastopexy, primarily because it's important that I be able to breastfeed someday. Also dreading the idea of having scars all around my nipples for a year. And, I'm happy with the size of my nipples, in theory; it's just the shape of my breasts that I want corrected. But, worried that not reducing/moving nipples will make implants look awkward/ less natural. Going small, 250cc or less.

Doctor Answers 12

Is periareolar mastopexy really necessary for tuberous breast correction?

Greetings

Thank you for your question. 

Size and shape of breasts can often play a critical role in a woman’s self-esteem. Fuller and bigger breasts are often associated with reproducibility therefore it is a desired condition. There are different kinds of breast augmentation operation types. Breast augmentation can be performed either with breast implants or autologous fat transfer. There are also different types of breast implants like teardrop or round implants. These implants also can be placed under or above the muscle. As you can imagine there are several different options for breast augmentation. The best way to understand which one is more suitable for you is to get a physical examination by a plastic surgeon.

It is important for you to understand that you don’t always need a breast implant for breast augmentation. As it was also mentioned above you can also get bigger and natural breasts with Cihantimur Fat Transfer method. In this method we use own fat tissue of the patient in order to increase the size of the breast. Since this tissue is your own tissue there is no risk for any adverse effects. It is safe and fast operation that yields natural results without any incision.


Turkey Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 79 reviews

TBD

No, you don't necessarily need a mastectomy in conjunction with your breast augmentation.  I recommend an in-office examination as well as a detailed discussion with a surgeon who you are comfortable with and who is a board-certified Plastic Surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Best wishes! Dr. Desai
Harvard Educated, Beverly Hills & Miami Beach Trained, Double-Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

Is periareolar mastopexy really necessary for tuberous breast correction?

A periareolar incision is recommended with a tuberous breast correction because it is hard to predict exactly where the inframammary fold will be after release of the constricted lower part of the breast.  But, it is not necessary and a mastopexy is rarely needed.  An inframammary incision can still be used but may end up a little higher than the actual fold.  If thats okay with you then it shouldn't be a problem.  It important to discuss your concerns with your plastic surgeon and find some who is comfortable treating tuberous breasts.

Adam Hamawy, MD
Princeton Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Breast augmentation tuberous

Thank you for your question and posting appropriate pix. You are a good candidate for breast augmentation using shaped textured silicone implants. You do not have to undergo a mastopexy at the same time. You would need a consultation and undergo Vectra 3D simulation for precise recomendations. 

Kevin Tehrani, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 88 reviews

Mild tuberous breast deformity

Dear Ocococ,
Although you have some component of tuberous deformity, enlarged areolae with herniation of breast tissue into them, it is a very mild case.  Your areolae are slightly enlarged and will likely become larger with breast augmentation alone.  If you accept this fact, then an inframammary breast augmentation approach can be performed.  Procedures to reduce the areolae and lift the breasts can always be done after childbearing as well.  Good luck!

Breast augmentation

You appear to have minimal to none of the features of the tuberous breast deformity. You have a breast augmentation done through the peri-areolar incision or an inframammary incision. Both will heal very well and since you are not going too big with your implant choices, both will work great. There may be some constricting bands causing the slightly puffy look of your areolae, those are easier to release through the peri-areolar incision. Good luck!

Implants only

You do not really have a classic tuberous issue. Yos can have implants only and if the puffiness of the areola bothers you, they can always be treated at a later time.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Breast augmentation

Hello and thank you for your question. Based on your photograph, you are a great candidate for a breast augmentation.  You do not need a periareolar mastopexy.  I think you could have a small incision technique (less than 2cm) and have a nice result with 250cc implant.  The most important aspect is to find a surgeon you are comfortable with. I recommend that you seek consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you in person.

Best wishes and good luck.

Richard G. Reish, M.D.
Harvard-trained plastic surgeon

Richard G. Reish, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 78 reviews

Your breasts

You seem to be full of misinformation. I don't believe your breasts are tuberous. You can have an augmentation without changing your areolae - they are not very large. Even if you have a circumareolar scar, you should be able to nurse. Your infra mammary line can be lowered even if the implants are put in via a small circumareolar scar. Sounds like you need a second opinion. 

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Tuberous breasts

Some degree of internal scoring may be indicated but not if you plan on breast feeding. The trade off may be abnormal shape.
An exam and consultation with a plastic surgeon is recommended to discuss your options and expectations. 

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.