botox for outer corner browlift

I get botox for wrinkle prevention, but i took a break for almost a year, no wrinkles but my eyebrows in the outer corner seem lower. my botox provider is no longer in practice and said she never gave me a browlift (only 21 units in total btw forehead and crowfeets) . my question, how do i get a browlift with botox (the outer corner of the brow).

Doctor Answers 17

Lateral #Browlift with Botox

Just 3 to 4 units of Botox in the lateral outer fibers of the periorbital sling will allow the lateral brows to lift.  You might want to check out the video above to get a better idea about how this is done.

If your lids are more relaxed than when you were younger, you might also consider a more permanent improvement via a series of Pellevé treatments.

I do hope this is helpful to you! Please let me know if you have any further questions.

All the best, Dr, Clark.


New York Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Botox browlift

There are several techniques to shape and lift the brow with Botox and the other neuromodulator.  You should see an injection specialist who is an oculo-plastic surgeon and is very familiar with treating this area.  Sometimes a nice adjunct to using Botox is to put a drop of filler to support the lateral brow so it doesn't droop.  Juvederm, Perlane or Radiesse are all very effective for this (off label).  This can often make the result last much longer than just using botox by itself but it completely depends on the shape of the brow, face , bone structure, etc.
Most importantly, see someone with experience treating this area and you'll likely love the results.

Other non surgical devices to help lift the brows are Ulthera and ThermiRF so you may want to also discuss these options with your doctor.

Best of luck!

Joseph A. Eviatar, MD, FACS
New York Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

You can achieve a brow lift when a small amount of Botox is administered to the tail of the eyebrow.

You can achieve a brow lift when a small amount of Botox is administered to the tail of the eyebrow. When crows feet and forehead are treated sometimes a brow lift effect can happen.

Visit an expert injector for a consultation. All injectors should be familiar with obtaining a brow lift.

Best,

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 427 reviews

Botox for Browlift

Many patients come to me and ask specifically for Botox to raise their brow.  Sometimes a lift can be accomplished by injecting into the brow by the "tail of the eyebrow" and into the part of the forehead.  If this has been done for you in the past with good results then you are a great candidate for a Botox brow lift.  Some patients, however, have hooding of the eyes and their skin laxity is too much above the eyes and these patients are generally not a good candidate for Botox in their brow or forehead area.  For the best results please contact a board certified dermatologist with a great deal of experience with Botox and cosmetic procedures.

Botox for outer corner browlift

The Orbicularis Oculi muscle pulls down the outer part of your eyebrow and the forehead muscle lift it.
Botox weakens the muscle that pulls downwards and allows the upward pulling muscle to work un opposed.
Injecting the crows feet + 2 units of Botox or Xeomin under the tail of the eyebrow usually helps
Hope you find this useful

Botox Browlifts For Restoring The Upward & Outward Flare Of The Lateral Third Of The Eyebrow

As my colleagues have already pointed out, the Botox browlift that you enjoyed in the past likely came from the  injections of Botox used to treat the uppermost portions of the crow's feet. A tiny droplet of Botox (or Dysport and Xeomin, two other neuromodulators) injected into the tail of the eyebrows is likely to give you a more direct lift to the lateral third of the eyebrows. When required, I simply often add this droplet to the eyebrow tail immediately following the treatment of the crow's feet. 

Nelson Lee Novick, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Botox browlift

that browlift effect you got was form injecting the crows feet area, so that is where you can have it done again.

Julio Garcia, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Botox and brow lift

The treatment of the crow's feet can cause the lateral brow to lift by deactivating the orbicularis oculi in the lateral eye region.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Botox for a Brow Lift

Dear angelika72:

Botox is a muscle relaxer used cosmetically. Among many other things, it is used to rebalance the muscles of expression on your forehead (or face, or neck) by weakening muscles pulling on your forehead skin in one direction while gravity and muscles can pull in another direction. This is how skilled and artful physicians can reduce folds and lines and elevate or change the shape of your brows.

Botox relaxes the muscle that pull on the skin creating expression. If the circular muscle which squeezes the eye shut and pulls the brow down is weakened, the opposing muscle called the frontalis will lift the brow upward. The circular muscle must be skillfully and artfully injected at the inner brow, the outer brow and occasionally just above the brow if it raises too much. 

Please choose a well experienced and Board Certified Plastic Surgeon or Facial ENT to evaluate your needs and provide you the recommendations that are BEST for YOU.

I hope this helps. All the best!

Dean P. Kane, MD, FACS
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 70 reviews

Brow lift with botox

There is a delicate balance between muscles that act to raise and lower the brow; different parts of the brow have varying muscles that produce this interaction. Brow shape and height can be altered by botox when injected appropriately. However, this needs to be adjusted based on individual brow characteristics. 

Matthias Solomon, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.