Any suggestions on baldness and Face/neck lift?

Hello Dr I am a 55 year male who wants to have a facelift. Practically no wriggles and mild saggy skin. Not looking to have anything else, everything else is done already. Mine concern is the sagging skin around my nose the parenthesis. I am bald and I shave my head and I want to have the least obvious incisions so I don’t want to correct one problem and then create another. 1-First question is, do you have your own operating room? 2-What do you charge for this procedure, mid face lift/ neck

Doctor Answers 17

Any suggestions on baldness and Face/neck lift?

Hello parker22,

The parenthesis around the mouth are not addressed will with a facelift.  These are better camouflaged with fillers, fat grafting, or SMAS grafting.  The incisions for those grafts are either inside the nose or in the crease next to the nose.  A facelift addresses sagging skin and bags that develop as tissue falls.  If you don't have that, then a facelift would not be the recommendation.  

I'd recommend you consult with a facial plastic surgeon or plastic surgeon to better evaluate your concern and determine the best treatment option.  

I hope this helps and good luck.  

The Woodlands Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Male facelifts

Facelifts can be wonderful for men to help rejuvenate the face.  I perform my facelifts in a hospital as I believe this is the safest place for this type of lengthy procedure.

Parenthesis lines

Thank you for your question and for sharing your concerns with us.  I would recommend considering non-surgical options such as dermal fillers to help you achieve your goals.  If you like the results but are looking for a longer lasting approach, then you can consider fat grafting in the future.  A surgical facelift is going to help you address regions such as the jowls, marionette region, neck region, but not necessarily the parenthesis folds around the nose.

Is a Facelift Appropriate?

The first question I would ask is whether a facelift is the right procedure for you at this time.  The parentheses lines can be filled and volume added to the face.  A consultation would be more useful in answering these questions.  Regarding facelift incision planning and minimization of obvious incisions: modern facelift techniques rely on the SMAS as the tension bearing layer, minimizing tension on the skin and allowing for fine scars.  I own and operate a AAAASF certified operating room and price ranges are posted on our website.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 81 reviews

Sagging Around Nose and Parenthesis

Dear Parker, Thank you for posting your interesting questions. At 55 years of age, most of the volume loss in your face is due to bone loss. The best way to restore the sagging around your nose and parenthesis area is with a facial volumizer/filler like Sculptra Aesthetic which is FDA approved and lasts 2 years. This will give you the most natural results in conjuction with your facelift. A facelift alone will not address these areas. Please consult with an experienced Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who can examine you, listen to your questions, concerns and expectations and determine if this is your best option. Please make sure that you see before and after photographs before you proceed. Best wishes, Dr. Richard Swift

Face/neck lift in someone without hair

Great question- for my patients who are bald- the incisions are modified to lie within preexisting creases around the ear. This way, you get the facelift and neck lift results while being able to hide the incisions. 

Having worked on many male patients without hair, this is a viable alternative to the full incision, producing excellent results in the face and neck. 

The procedure can also be combined with other procedures, such as a fat transfer filler in the mid face- nasolabial area to further enhance the results for a natural rejuvenation. 

Dilip D. Madnani, MD, FACS
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 73 reviews


Before considering surgery, I would recommend considering injections directly into the areas of concern...your nasolabial folds. This can be done with your own fat or with injectable fillers such as Juvederm or Radiesse. The cost is significantly less and the incisions are essentially non existent.

Facelift vs fillers

While a facelift can be performed in a bald man, your concern at your nasolabial folds may be best treated with filler products. Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

A facelift and a bald 55-year-old male.

Even conventional facelift can be executed with great success in someone with no hair. However depending on the aesthetic problems there are variations on incisions to take this into consideration. Taking advantage of volume enhancement is part of the overall strategy is important as well.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Facelift and Male Baldness Scars

I have performed facelifts on a few bald men.  The scars can be a little more visible but I do spend a great deal of time marking with pen and showing them in advance where the incisions will be located.  If you have sagging jowls and neck to improve then there will be more incisions.   If you just have a fatty neck and not a lot of loose skin then your plastic surgeon may be able to offer liposuction of the neck which is less incisions. 
Scar gels for post surgery are very helpful for healing .A male face lift in my practice is about 4 hours of surgery time.  Fees do include an outpatient operating room, a overnight stay , anesthesia and can be 14,000 -15,000.  Photos of the front and sides of your face in advance are a good way to start your search with a board certified plastic surgeon.

John Ward, MD (retired)
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.