Hydroxylapatite For bony dorsal hump augmentation?

Would this be a good option to restore a small (2mm) bony hump? Or is diced septal cartilage better?

Doctor Answers 9

Hydroxapatite

Hydroxyapatite is no good in areas that may be subject to shear stress - the narrow bridge area would be vulnerable to shattering with minimal trauma  to the bridge if hydroxyapatite was used - you need diced cartilage and fascia or traditional rib cartilage

Hydroxylapatite For bony dorsal hump augmentation?

Greetings

Thank you for your question. The most important aspect is to find a surgeon you are comfortable with. I recommend that you seek consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you in person.

Bulent Cihantimur, MD
Turkey Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 80 reviews

There are a number of materials that we use to augment the nasal dorsum, I prefer natural materials

Hydrolylapetite is one synthetic implant that is used to augment noses. This is very rarely used any more since there have been a number of issues. For alloplastic or synthetic materials, I prefer Gortex. Even better, I like natural cartilage that is from your own body. We can dice the cartilage and reform it with tissue glue or wrap it in fascia. I prefer either to hydroxylapetite.

Steven J. Pearlman, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 109 reviews

Whole septal cartilage for dorsal hump augmentation

Revision rhinoplasty is a very difficult endeavor, and usually the bridge of the nose is built up with patient's own   Nasal/ septal  cartilage.  It is important to know whether or not there is any cartilage left over from the prior rhinoplasty.  

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 129 reviews

Dorsal augmentation

Hello and thank you for your question. Hydroxyapetite is not a good option for the dorsum.  I have seen this before and it can produce contour irregularities.  Diced cartilage is a much better technique in the right hands.  The most important aspect is to find a surgeon you are comfortable with. I recommend that you seek consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you in person.

Best wishes and good luck.

Richard G. Reish, M.D.
Harvard-trained plastic surgeon

Richard G. Reish, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 81 reviews

Dorsal augmentation

I prefer cartilage myself to add volume to the dorsum.  Best to be seen in person for evaluation.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Add A Hump

There are a couple options for restoring or adding a slight dorsal hump to the nose.

•   Bone or Cartilage Graft. Requires an operation to place and/or remove, however, once the grafts take the result is long-term. Moderate amount of downtime and recovery. More expensive.

•   Hyaluronic Acid Fillers. IE Juvederm or Restylane. Placement in the office without need for an OR, however, the grafts are only temporary and the result must be touched up every so often to maintain the result. No down time or recovery. Much less expensive. 

A detailed examination will help delineate the best option. Consultation with a surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery would be the next best step.

Dorsal contouring

Interesting question.  Hydroxy is a great product - however, when stressed, it reacts much like fine china; i.e. it shatters.  diced cartilage and fascia can be much more controlled, give you a softer contour, as well as the added benefit of a more natural texture to the soft tissue of the skin.  There are different ways to obtain enough cartilage to create diced cartilage augmentations - septal, auricular, and rib are all popular.  

Miguel Mascaro, MD
Delray Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Dorsal Augmentation

Diced cartilage would be better because it is a more controllable material for placement. In addition some of your bony hump is probably not on bone at all as most hump reductions have a cartilaginous component as well.

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